Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Status and characteristics of reading programs in Oregon public secondary schools Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/dr26z1620

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  • Purpose The purpose of this study was to discover the status and characteristics of reading programs in the public secondary schools of Oregon. Procedures Questionnaires were mailed to all of Oregon's 327 schools, 106 junior high schools and 221 senior high schools. Responses were received from 84.7 percent of the schools, 94.3 percent of the junior high schools and 79.6 percent of the senior high schools. The questionnaires consisted of two sections, one for schools without organized reading programs and one for schools with organized reading programs. The data were divided into eight different categories: (1) total public secondary schools, (2) total junior high schools, (3) large junior high schools, (4) small junior high schools, (5) total senior high schools, (6) large senior high schools, (7) medium senior high schools, and (8) small senior high schools. Randomly selected visitations were made to five junior high schools and to ten senior high schools to compare the working program with the described program. Respondents in 73.6 percent of the junior high schools and in 39.4 percent of the senior high schools indicated that their schools had organized reading programs. This is a total of 50.5 percent of Oregon's public secondary schools. Summary Respondents in 89.0 percent of the schools without reading programs indicated that a need for reading programs existed. Plans were being made to introduce reading programs in 59.1 percent of these schools. About 72.9 percent of the reading programs were less than six years old and a majority had been partially supported by Federal funds. Reading instruction in basic reading skills was generally provided in full credit classes which met five days each week. The prevailing method of:selecting students for the classes was by teacher and counselor recommendation along with their standardized test scores. In about 40 percent of the schools, 25 percent of the students had been identified as reading below grade level. In about 20 percent of the schools, 25 percent of the students were receiving special reading instruction Approximately 85 percent of the reading teachers have had at least one course in reading. About one-third of the schools had a written course of study. Tape recorders were used in 85.2 percent of the schools; controlled readers in 82.7 percent; record players in 68.5 percent; tachistoscopic devices in 67.3 percent; and pacers in 63.0 percent of the schools. Conclusions The status of reading programs in the state of Oregon is one of rapid growth. The greatest need for reading programs is in the small senior high schools. There is a great need for well prepared reading teachers. Oregon secondary students are being discriminated against because of the shortage of adequately prepared teachers of reading and the inability of the subject matter teachers to teach those reading skills necessary for understanding in their content areas. The total evaluative program is inadequate and inaccurate. Very little reading instruction is being given in the content areas by classroom teachers. The emphasis is upon remediation and correction rather than continuous development of reading skills. In general, schools with reading programs have enthusiastic personnel who believe the programs are successful.
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