Student College Enrollment and High School Counseling : Two Studies Based on Data Collected in an Urban School District Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/dr26z198c

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  • Student success in terms of college preparedness and postsecondary college enrollment is one of the current major focus in the school counseling profession. The current literature indicates that school counselors can positively influence their students’ needs and performance outcomes, yet the profession is calling for more evidence to support the role of the school counselor as it is yet clearly defined, understood, and strongly supported. There is a dearth of research that examined the extent student contacts with school counselors and comprehensive school counseling program implementation levels predict student postsecondary enrollment in 2- and/or 4-year colleges. Based on social capital theory, the purpose of this dissertation was to examine school counselor interventions and school counseling programs as sources of social capital for high school students in their postsecondary college enrollment. The researcher investigated school counselor interventions through two studies based on two archival datasets obtained from an urban school district in a Western state in the United States. The first study (N=2,209) used multiple logistic regression analysis and the second (N=1,919) used multinomial logistic regression analysis. The first study examined the extent school counselor contacts could predict students' subsequent postsecondary enrollment in 2- or 4-year institutions within five years of high school graduation. Results in this study indicated that that counselor contact regarding college planning, attendance, and free and reduced lunch status were significant predictors of postsecondary enrollment. Counselor contact regarding goal setting, concerns about grades, and needing more college information did not significantly predict postsecondary college enrollment. The first study correctly predicted 69% of the outcomes. The second study examined the extent comprehensive school counseling program implementation and school counselor-student ratios (caseload size) could predict students' subsequent postsecondary enrollment in 2-year and/or 4-year institutions within three years of high school graduation. Results from the study indicated that caseload size, three of four comprehensive school counseling program implementation groups, and some ethnicities were significant predictors of postsecondary enrollment. The second study correctly predicted 59.9% of the outcomes. Overall, findings in both studies contribute to the growing body of knowledge that supports the hypothesis that school counselor contacts with students and comprehensive school counseling programs are contributing to students' social capital in relation to students' postsecondary college enrollment. Findings in these studies bear relevance for practicing school counselors, counselor educators, and administrators.
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  • description.provenance : Rejected by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu), reason: Rejecting for the following reasons - 1) Change the commencement date on the bottom of the title page to read - Commencement June 2017. Also on the title page after - Doctor of Philosophy remove "in Counseling" 2) On the Approval page, 1st signature line change Dr. Kok-Mun Ng so it reads - Major Professor, representing Counseling 3) Since bolding is not allowed in the pretext pages, remove the bolding in the Table of Contents. Everything else looks good. Once revised log back into ScholarsArchive and go to the upload page. Replace the attached file with the revised PDF and resubmit. Thanks, Julie on 2016-06-24T15:04:15Z (GMT)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2016-06-29T19:31:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 TangAngelaK2016.pdf: 876551 bytes, checksum: b3525de911500946dcb5bdc2fec60a39 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-06-06
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-06-29T15:26:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TangAngelaK2016.pdf: 876551 bytes, checksum: b3525de911500946dcb5bdc2fec60a39 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Angela Tang (tangang@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-06-23T17:50:43Z No. of bitstreams: 1 TangAngelaK2016.pdf: 877484 bytes, checksum: d2910c84fd41998f77bda954857af343 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Angela Tang (tangang@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-06-28T05:29:24Z No. of bitstreams: 1 TangAngelaK2016.pdf: 876551 bytes, checksum: b3525de911500946dcb5bdc2fec60a39 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-06-29T19:31:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TangAngelaK2016.pdf: 876551 bytes, checksum: b3525de911500946dcb5bdc2fec60a39 (MD5)

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