The effect of topdressed lime upon pasture production and quality Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/fb494d794

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  • Soil acidity is a major factor inhibiting pasture production in western Oregon. The typical management solution to acidic soil problems is to lime. However, lime cannot be incorporated directly into the soil in established pasture. The only alternative is topdress or surface apply lime and wait for soil fauna to mix the lime through the soil profile. Unfortunately, there is little previous research to indicate if topdressed lime mixes through the soil profile, increase production, or improve quality. A lime trial was undertaken at four sites to address these problems. The four sites were in Tillamook County, Lane County, Polk County, and on campus/Benton county. Each site consisted of three replications, except the campus site which had four replications, of 0, 1, or 2 T/A lime in a randomized block or completely randomized design. The actual liming took place in the fall of 1993. In 1994 and 1995 each site was clipped on a regular basis for total production and plant nutrient analysis. At the end of the growing season, soil was sampled to measure the degree of lime mixing and the effect of lime upon soil nutrient status. In 1994, no significant production, plant tissue nutrient, lime mixing, or soil nutrient changes were observed. In 1995, the Tillamook and Polk County sites displayed significantly increased soil pH and soil Ca to a depth of two inches. The Lane County and campus sites both displayed significant lime mixing to at least four inches. Also, the Tillamook and Lane County sites demonstrated significantly increased production and N uptake. Yet, the Polk County and campus sites demonstrated no significant change in production. No relevant plant tissue nutrient changes were detected. Based upon these results, lime seemed able to mix readily through the soil, pasture production could be affected by lime, plant tissue nutrient concentrations were not affected by lime, and the increased production might be due to the effects of increased soil pH upon N cycling.
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