Problem solving strategies of Thai second graders for addition and subtraction word problems Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/ff365868n

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate solution strategies that Thai second graders used to solve addition and subtraction word problems. Fifty-eight children participated in this study, 40 children took a written test, and 18 children participated in an interview. In addition, two classrooms were selected for observation, and six second-grade teachers completed a questionnaire regarding their understanding of mathematical problem solving. The results indicated that Thai children in this study were successful in solving addition and subtraction word problems. For addition word problems, the compare problem and the join problem were the easiest problems. The combine problem was moderately difficult. For subtraction word problems, the compare problem and the separate problem were easy while the combine problem was difficult. The join problem was the most difficult subtraction word problem. Since word problems used in this study contained mostly two-digit numbers, Thai children in this study used knowledge such as borrowing, carrying and regrouping to solve two-digit addition and subtraction word problems. Most Thai children in this study used counting strategies with fingers to solve both addition and subtraction word problems. Counting on strategies were most often used for addition word problems and counting up strategies were most often used for subtraction word problems. Counting all strategies were not used by Thai children in this study. Other strategies that were not based on counting strategies were also found. Those strategies were using tallies, using a known number fact, using an invented fingers model, and using a base-ten strategy. The strategies that Thai children used to solve word problems were not different from those used by children in United States and other countries such as Korea. Most children used three basic strategies to solve word problems: counting strategies; using a known number fact; and using a base-ten strategy. However, the base-ten strategy was not usually used by children in United States. The base-ten strategy was used by Thai children in this study and in Asia countries such as Korea. Moreover, the findings showed that Thai children in this study used mostly fingers to represent counting sequences while children in the United States used other physical objects such as cubes and counters. In observing Thai classroom instruction and having Thai teachers complete the questionnaire, the results suggested that Thai teachers in this study viewed problems as routine word problems and viewed problem solving as solving routine word problems. Teachers did not emphasize problem solving, reasoning, and thinking skills. As a result, children developed memorizing skills rather than thinking and reasoning skills. Children had never explored different types of word problems and non-routine problems, so when the children were faced with problems that differed from their school mathematics instruction, for the most part, children were unable to solve the problems.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 256 Grayscale, 24-bit Color) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-09-27T19:05:54Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SwangrojnPorntip1999.pdf: 9759693 bytes, checksum: f7696fa5fb530afb0e999c167c16f305 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (ecscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2012-09-27T18:54:06Z No. of bitstreams: 1 SwangrojnPorntip1999.pdf: 9759693 bytes, checksum: f7696fa5fb530afb0e999c167c16f305 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-09-27T19:06:42Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SwangrojnPorntip1999.pdf: 9759693 bytes, checksum: f7696fa5fb530afb0e999c167c16f305 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-09-27T19:06:42Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 SwangrojnPorntip1999.pdf: 9759693 bytes, checksum: f7696fa5fb530afb0e999c167c16f305 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1999-03-18

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items