A study of recruitment techniques which influence student selection of vocational-technical education Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/fn107189p

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  • Purpose of the Study The purpose of this study was to determine the exposure and influence of recruitment techniques and influential sources and factors which influenced student selection of vocational-technical education. Procedures The data for this study were obtained through the use of a student questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered to a total of 578 community college respondents within the urban, suburban and rural geographical areas in the State of Oregon. The Chi-square and t-Test statistics were used in statistically analyzing the data in reference to the classification of students--high school, transfer and out-of-school students within the urban, suburban and rural geographical areas. Conclusions From the results of this study, the following conclusions and implications can be drawn: 1. Career days, scheduling a conference with the community college guidance counselor and brochures, flyers, leaflets and booklets were ranked first, second and third respectively, in all geographical areas as the three most influential recruitment techniques. 2. The influence of other recruitment techniques were dependent upon the classification of students within each geographical area. A closer analysis of these recruitment techniques may assist college personnel in providing more effective recruitment programs. 3. It can be concluded that high school students had significantly greater overall contact and influence of recruitment techniques, and transfer and out-of-school students were significantly lower. 4. Parents, guardian or relatives and the community college guidance counselor were ranked first and second respectively by the classification of students in all geographical areas as being the most influential in offering personal advice. 5. In general, the transfer and out-of-school students ranked the employer, employment agency, welfare agency and rehabilitation agency as being higher among influential sources as compared to the total composite profile. 6. The parents, guardian or relatives were ranked first as an influential source, however ranked sixth in providing recruitment information to the respective classifications of students. It would be advantageous to provide more recruitment information to the parents, guardian or relatives, considering their influence with the respective classifications of students. 7. It can be concluded that there is a direct correlation between the quantity of recruitment information disseminated by influential sources and their relative influence upon the respective classifications of students. 8. The rural composite profile provided a larger quantity of recruitment information as compared to the total composite profile. 9. The influential sources which ranked first and second respectively by all geographical areas and classifications of students were recruitment information mailed by community college and recruitment information disseminated by the community college guidance counselor and faculty. Recommendations It is recommended that the findings of this study be utilized by community college personnel of vocational-technical education in planning and developing effective recruitment programs related to the different classifications of students. It is specifically recommended that community college personnel in vocational-technical education critically analyze the findings of this study in relationship to the recruitment techniques, recruitment informational dissemination sources and influential sources which were influential in recruiting, and adapt these influential factors to their present recruitment programs.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Katy Davis(kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2014-02-17T18:09:31Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HullmanDonH1971.pdf: 1215368 bytes, checksum: 1e92c21f74a40be17e6fc6f1ea3aad80 (MD5)
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