An analysis of the relationship between the preferred cognitive learning style of field independence/field dependence and success in learning English as a second language among post-secondary Japanese students Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/fn107313r

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  • The research analyzed the relationship between the preferred cognitive learning style of field independence/field dependence and success in learning English as a second language (ESL) among post-secondary Japanese students. The study provided a review of literature in the field and developed a methodology including identification of appropriate measurement instruments. The testing was done with students at Tokyo International University of American (TIUA) in Salem, Oregon, and the findings were used to make recommendations concerning field independence/field dependence (FIIFD) as it affects post-secondary Japanese ESL learners. Three tests were administered to the entire TIUA student body of 117 students. The first, the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) was administered to measure field independence! field dependence. Two tests were administered to measure success in ESL. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT) were both given to measure success in ESL. The differences between the pretest scores and post test scores were then compared to GEFT scores to determine the correlation of FI/FD and ESL success. Analysis of the testing indicated that for overall success in ESL, there does not seem to be a relationship with FI/FD. However, on specific skills, as measured by the subtests, there may be a relationship. Since results on the TOEFL and CELT were consistent with each other except for the listening subtest, it was further concluded that the two tests measure the same thing. In addition to the relationship of Fl/Fl) and ESL, certain demographic factors were also examined to determine their relationship to success in ESL. While there does not appear to be a significant relationship between ESL success and a student's choice of major, there may be a relationship with the demographic factors of age, gender, and previous experience with English.
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