Comparing measures of beliefs about drug-taking compliance Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/fq977x644

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  • The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between two different methods of measuring beliefs about drug-taking compliance and the behavior of drug-taking compliance, and to compare the predictive ability of the two methods of measuring beliefs about drug-taking compliance. The belief examined was perceived seriousness, a health belief, in subjects with urinary tract infections. Subjects completed a pre-drug regimen survey before they began any medications. A post-drug regimen telephone interview was conducted approximately ten days later. The relationship between each of the two different measures of perceived seriousness and drug-taking compliance was calculated. Both measures of perceived seriousness had a positive relationship with drug-taking compliance. However, the refined measure that was more specific in terms of action, target, context and time had a greater, statistically significant relationship with drug-taking compliance than the measure traditionally used by Health Belief Model researchers. The ability of the two different measures of perceived seriousness to predict drug-taking compliance behavior was compared. The refined measure was a significantly better predictor of drug-taking compliance than the Health Belief Model's traditional manner of measuring health beliefs. These results can serve as a way to better understand the problem of noncompliance.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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