A comparison of student affect and kinesic behavior Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/g158bm360

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  • This investigation was designed to determine whether or not the nonverbal behaviors of junior high and secondary school science students could be systematically analyzed. It was further determine what relationship exists between the nonverbal behaviors of students and their attitude. The hypotheses investigated were as follows: H₁: A valid and reliable instrument for the systematic observation of junior high school and/or secondary school student nonverbal behavior can be developed. H₂: A significant positive relationship exists between the measured nonverbal behaviors exhibited by high school and/or junior high school students and their attitude toward their teacher and/or their class. The first phase of the study involved pilot work. Ten video tapes were made of junior high and secondary school students in typical lecture-discussion activity. Student behaviors were recorded in handwritten descriptions, and these descriptions together with results reported in the professional literature were compiled into an instrument designed to systematically quantify student nonverbal behavior. After the instrument had been completed the researcher administered a questionnaire to 181 students to determine their attitude toward their teachers and courses. From the population of 181 students a sample giving an extreme positive response and a sample giving an extreme negative response to the questionnaire were drawn. From the samples 54 20-minute video tapes were made -- 27 from the positive sample and 27 from the negative sample. The behaviors were then quantified using the instrument designed for that purpose. The behaviors as related to attitude were then analyzed using discriminant function analysis. The Findings Hypothesis One was accepted based on the implicit characteristics of the instrument, the nature of its development, and the method of encoding behaviors. The method of development provided a comprehensive catalogue of behaviors based on a sound theoretical framework, The behaviors were actually signs rather than categories which contributed to precise definitions of each cue and virtually eliminated the need for observer inference when the behaviors were coded. The number of choices an observer was forced to choose among was small, which further contributed to coding accuracy. Finally, time sampling with a short time interval was used which prevented the "loss" of an appreciable number of behaviors, and generally high coefficients of inter-observer agreement were obtained, which contributed to the instruments objectivity. These factors argue cogently for the instrument's validity and reliability. Thus, Hypothesis One was accepted based on the arguments cited. Hypothesis Two was completely accepted in all cases. Two different data measures were analyzed for the entire sample with both measures showing highly significant relationships (p < . 005 for most cases) between attitude and nonverbal behaviors. In addition a selected subsample was analyzed as a check against a possible bias in the sampling procedure. The results of the final analysis strongly supported the results obtained from the total sample. In sum the following variables were found to be significantly related to positive attitude toward the teacher. (1) Gaze direction toward teacher, (2) Taking notes, (3) Smiles, (4) Interactions with teacher, and (5) Frequency of raising hand. Positive attitude was found to be weakly related to (6) Forward lean, and (7) Object manipulation. Negative attitude was found to be related to the following variables. (1) Head on hands (or fist) with hands on desk, (2) Eyes closed, (3) Frequency of yawns, (4) Frequency of negative head shakes, and (5) Frequency of turning head to greater than 90° from immediate. A weak relationship was found between negative attitude and (6) Supporting head, (7) Self manipulation for girls, and (8) Head down for boys. In each of the cases cited above a weak relationship does not imply statistical insignificance. All variables were significant at 05 and most were significant well beyond . 005. The results of the study support findings reported in the professional literature by Hall, Mehrabian, and Rosenfeld.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-02-20T18:18:57Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 EggenPaulD1972.pdf: 2241462 bytes, checksum: e1f45fe90f7b9401a7958ac4633748cf (MD5)

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