Porosity, surface area and enzymatic saccharification of microcrystalline cellulose Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/g445ch62v

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  • The research described in this thesis was aimed at understanding how particle size, porosity, and enzyme accessible surface area influence the rate of saccharification of microcrystalline cellulose. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) is a commonly used substrate for the study of cellulolytic enzymes. MCC preparations of different particle size are commercially available. In this study, MCC preparations having average particle sizes of 20, 50, and 90 μm were analyzed with respect to their enzyme accessible surface area, chemical and physical properties and rates of enzymatic saccharification. Saccharification studies were done using a commercially available cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei. Pore volume distributions were determined from solute exclusion experiments. Internal surface areas were calculated based on the application of the lamellae model to the pore volume distribution data. External surface areas were calculated based on the average particle size of each MCC preparation assuming that the particles could be represented as solid spheres. The different MCC preparations were found to have nearly equivalent enzyme accessible surface areas per unit weight. Greater than 99 % of the total enzyme accessible surface area for each MCC preparations was found to be within the porous structure of the particles. Enzymatic saccharification experiments demonstrated that the smaller particle size MCCs were more readily digested than those of larger particle size. The similarity of the three MCC preparations with respect to chemical and physical properties (other than particle size), pore volume distribution, and total enzyme accessible surface area suggests that a rate limiting factor in the enzymatic digestion of MCC is a resistance attributable to diffusion within the capillary network of these insoluble substrates.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-12-12T18:36:07Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TANTASUCHARITUSICHA1995.pdf: 810504 bytes, checksum: a39315fd573d786fce90b53e651c15c2 (MD5)
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