Fallow water retention and wheat growth as affected by tillage method and surface soil compaction Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/gb19f8062

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • No-tillage winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in a wheat-fallow cropping system has consistently produced lower grain yields than conventionally tilled soils in the semiarid Pacific Northwest. A 2-year study was conducted in a long-term tillage trial at Moro, OR to determine factors responsible for differences in wheat growth and yield as affected by moldboard plow, stubble mulch, and no-tillage fallow method. Soil water, soil mineral N, plant N uptake, soil temperature, above-ground dry matter accumulation, and yield components were measured. The highest fallow efficiency during both years was achieved by stubble mulch tillage, followed by the plow and no-tillage systems. Accelerated water loss from no-tillage fallow occurred during the hot, dry summer due to uninterrupted capillary flow. The main yield limitations to no-tillage technology in this study were: (1) diminished seedzone water at planting time in the fall which resulted in reduced germination and stand establishment; (2) cooler spring soil temperatures which slowed crop development and dry matter accumulation, and; (3) production of fewer spikes per unit area. The second objective of this study was to determine if late season seedzone water loss from fallow could be reduced by altering the physical characteristics of the dust mulch. Loss of seedzone water appears to accelerate in late August and September because of increased diurnal heat flux. Compacting the soil surface with a roller in mid-August increased surface bulk density and volumetric water content to depths as great as 10 cm. Evaporative water loss from compacted plots, however, occurred at a faster rate than from control plots and, by mid-September, there were no differences in seedzone water content among treatments. Increased soil thermal conductivity appeared to be the reason for accelerated water loss in compacted treatments. Although water loss occurred at a faster rate in compacted treatments, compacting fallow soils with a roller immediately prior to fall seeding may increase winter wheat germination, emergence, and stand establishment during years of marginal seedzone water.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6770A in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-01-29T16:16:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SchillingerWilliamFred1992.pdf: 4245304 bytes, checksum: 801ec23a7e42074614a8000a0bf7a748 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-01-28T21:53:34Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SchillingerWilliamFred1992.pdf: 4245304 bytes, checksum: 801ec23a7e42074614a8000a0bf7a748 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-01-29T16:16:40Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 SchillingerWilliamFred1992.pdf: 4245304 bytes, checksum: 801ec23a7e42074614a8000a0bf7a748 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1992-04-06
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kaylee Patterson (kdpscanner@gmail.com) on 2013-01-28T20:16:41Z No. of bitstreams: 1 SchillingerWilliamFred1992.pdf: 4245304 bytes, checksum: 801ec23a7e42074614a8000a0bf7a748 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/04/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items