Thermal insulation values of wool and acrylic blankets before and after laundering Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/gh93h256q

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  • Twelve Acrilan acrylic, twelve Orlon acrylic, and twelve wool blankets were studied to determine the effect of laundering on thermal insulation value. The thirty-six blankets used in this study were selected and purchased by Florence Petzel for use in the study of the effects of maintenance on wool and acrylic blankets. Specified sections of each of the blankets were laundered zero, one, five or ten times using a soak wash method. Cutting diagrams were then developed for each blanket section. Seven hundred twenty warmth tests specimens, each measuring five inches square, were prepared at the time of Petzel's study. They were kept under constant temperature before the testing began and throughout the testing procedures. The laboratory tests included a thickness reading on the Compressometer and a warmth determination using the Cenco-Fitch instrument. The data from the warmth study is discussed in two parts. The thickness measurements and thermal conductivity values for each laundry interval are noted first. This is followed by a discussion of the significance of the relationship of thickness to warmth. The findings show a loss in the thickness of the Orlon acrylic and Acrilan acrylic blankets during laundering caused by matting and/or a loss of fibers. Conversely, the wool blankets gained continuously in thickness due to shrinkage. The thickest blankets had the lowest thermal conductivity values and were the best insulators; the thinnest blankets had the largest thermal conductivity values and had the least insulation value. This emphasizes the importance of the retention of thickness for the maintenance of warmth. There was not a significant difference in the amount of heat that was transmitted by the Orlon acrylic, Acrilan acrylic or wool blankets. This implies that warmth is dependent upon the thickness of a blanket and the retention of that thickness rather than upon the fiber content. An increase in insulation value was generally followed by a decrease in insulation value if the blanket lost thickness. The insulation value improved if the blanket shrank and became more compact. However, there is a point at which compactness is detrimental to warmth because of the reduction of vital air spaces. It was concluded that the warmth of a blanket is controlled by the thickness of the blanket and its ability to retain that thickness with laundering. It was further concluded that a thickness reading which is interpreted along with data on dimensional stability, yarn count, weight, and breaking strength would be sufficient to predict warmth for consumer purposes and information. It was recommended that subjective testing with individuals be included in future evaluations for more meaningful information. The best guide for the selection of a blanket still appears to be the brand name of a reputable manufacturer and a business firm to which the blanket may be returned if its performance is not satisfactory. One could expect to find warm blankets made from any fiber material provided the blanket is suitably woven and sufficiently thick.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-05-14T15:30:56Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RohdeRosalynO1964.pdf: 2254229 bytes, checksum: b55769802d6449e158ee7bd4d4a460ae (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Katy Davis(kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2014-05-19T17:02:59Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RohdeRosalynO1964.pdf: 1841141 bytes, checksum: 0bda2f0ef5b0ca4bbbe2edbe739c7337 (MD5)
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