Transforming sectionalism to unity through narrative in John Brown Gordon's "The last days of the Confederacy" Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/gh93h359r

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • John Brown Gordon was committed to the mission of national reconciliation. He knew that the South would have to embrace the North to repair the devastation of the Civil War. Driven by dedication to public service after the war, he worked through his positions in governmental offices to help the South. As his public life slowed he began work on a lecture aimed at making him a peacemaker, a missionary for reconciliation. His purpose was to provide a broad, nationalistic perspective which created a common vantage point that would allow both Northerners and Southerners to derive pride and honor from their participation in the Civil War. The lecture, "The Last Days of the Confederacy," became very popular in a short period of time, and made Gordon one of the most requested speakers of the Southern Lyceum Program and Slayton Lyceum Program. The purpose of this critical interpretation of Gordon's lecture is to account for the effectiveness of the rhetorical elements and strategies in the work. The analysis will be based on Walter Fisher's narrative paradigm. Narratives dominate the content and structure of speech; narratives provide a way of ordering and presenting a view of the world through descriptions of a situation - -the act of storytellingthe format Gordon chose in creating the lecture. After drawing conclusions from application of the narrative paradigm I will focus on identifying and evaluating Gordon's rhetorical vision, which is based in Ernest Bormann's fantasy-theme theory. Finally, due to the synecdochal nature of the narratives I will use Kenneth Burke's four master tropes literature to fully interpret the various aspects of the narrative, which complements the initial mission of narrative criticism. In "The Last Days of the Confederacy," Gordon masterfully uses anecdotes from his experiences in the Civil War to create narrative sequences, which construct a strategy of transformative discourse. A typical sequence would start with an ingratiary tactic in which Gordon, in his eloquent manner, would describe a Northern character, scene, or theme and juxtapose it to another story from the South. The purpose of this sequence is to generate irony, creating a dialectic between the two stories, which, at the surface, seem to be opposed. His third step, then, was to use that dialectic to point to the commonalities between the North and the South. This he would do by illustrating an American trait, skill, or value. The result would be a major theme demonstrating a national value or belief to add strength to his existing compendium of themes, such as unity, fraternity, and brotherhood - -all tools to salve the process of reconciliation of conflict with face-saving for both.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kevin Martin (martikev@onid.orst.edu) on 2012-12-14T19:02:10Z No. of bitstreams: 1 AcklinDavidR1994.pdf: 2981022 bytes, checksum: 3114337628e4d34db7bb5f3cf3d76849 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-12-20T16:39:14Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 AcklinDavidR1994.pdf: 2981022 bytes, checksum: 3114337628e4d34db7bb5f3cf3d76849 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-12-20T16:39:14Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 AcklinDavidR1994.pdf: 2981022 bytes, checksum: 3114337628e4d34db7bb5f3cf3d76849 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1993-06-11
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-12-20T16:36:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 AcklinDavidR1994.pdf: 2981022 bytes, checksum: 3114337628e4d34db7bb5f3cf3d76849 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 10/19/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items