Gravity anomalies and their structural implications for the southern Oregon Cascade Mountains and adjoining Basin and Range province Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/gt54kq064

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  • Gravity measurements made during 1979 and 1980, combined with existing gravity measurements, provide data for the interpretation of upper crustal structures relevant to the assessment of the geothermal potential of south-central Oregon. West of Upper Klamath Lake, free-air gravity anomalies trend north-south and average near 35 mgals. East of Upper Klamath Lake, free-air gravity anomalies trend west to northwest, and average near ten mgals. The complete Bouguer anomaly field exhibits a regional gradient of nearly .4 mgals/km, which is attributed to the existence of a low-density upper mantle layer beneath the Basin and Range province. The large northwest-trending negative anomaly associated with the Klamath graben suggests a depth of low-density fill of up to 2300 m (7500 feet). The regional gravity field exhibits a broad regional high over the area surrounding Klamath Falls which may be caused by a shallow mantle or a large intrusive body at depth, or may simply be due to intense silicification of the area by thermal waters. The residual anomaly field exhibits broad bands of positive anomalies which enclose the negative anomaly associated with the Klamath graben. The easternmost of these broad, positive trends may correspond to the eastern flank of an anticline which may have existed prior to graben faulting. Positive anomalies west of the graben coincide with the Mount McLoughlin lineament. A large positive anomaly located south of Sprague River is interpreted to be a volcanic center and the heat source for thermal waters found in the Sprague River Valley. A two-dimensional cross section near 42°26' N. latitude suggests that step-like faults form the west side of the Klamath graben. The model indicates the presence of a high density body south of Sprague River that is interpreted to be a buried volcanic source for local extrusive volcanic rocks. Northwest-trending gravity anomalies west of Upper Klamath Lake indicate that structural trends of the Basin and Range province extend into the Cascade Mountains, and suggest that a heat source for thermal waters may exist beneath the High Cascades, rather than beneath the areas which exhibit geothermal activity.
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