A neuro-evolutionary multiagent approach to multi-linked inverted pendulum control Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/gt54kr26t

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  • Recent work has shown humanoid robots with spinal columns, instead of rigid torsos, benefit from both better balance and an increased ability to absorb external impact. Similarly, snake robots have shown promise as a viable option for exploration in confined spaces with limited human access, such as during power plant maintenance. Both spines and snakes, as well as hyper-redundant manipulators, can simplify to a model of a system with multiple links. The multi-link inverted pendulum is a well known benchmark problem in control systems due to its ability to accommodate varying model complexity. Such a system is useful for testing new learning algorithms or laying the foundation for autonomous control of more complex devices such as robotic spines and multi-segmented arms which currently use traditional control methods or are operated by humans. It is often easy to view these systems as single-agent learners due to the high level of interaction among the segments. However, as the number of links in the system increases, the system becomes harder to control. This work replaces the centralized learner with a team of coevolved agents. The use of a multiagent approach allows for control of larger systems. The addition of transfer learning not only increases the learning rate, but also enables the training of larger teams which were previously infeasible due to extended training times. The results presented support these claims by examining neuro-evolutionary control of 3-, 6-, and 12-link systems with nominal conditions as well as with sensor noise, actuator noise, and the addition of more complex physics.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-06-20T20:42:49Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SillsMastersTheisisFinal.pdf: 1547064 bytes, checksum: e1044ad47398bbe73c3a70b08c951355 (MD5)
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