Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

The growing skeleton : influence of lifestlye and the development of normative data using DXA Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/h128nh66c

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  • To examine the potential for exercise to build bone mass during growth, objectives of this dissertation included: 1) determine the effects of 7 months of jumping followed by 7 months of detraining on hip and spine bone mass in the prepubertal children; 2) determine variables that best predict bone mineral content (BMC;g) of the hip and spine in order to develop prediction equations for healthy, Caucasian children, specific to Hologic fan-beam DXA machines; and 3) to examine the potential synergy between calcium intake and the bone response to jump training in prepubertal children. Results/Conclusions Objective 1 (Chapters 2, 3 and 4): children who performed 300 jumps/week at a load magnitude of 8 body weights had significantly greater 7-month changes for BMC at the femoral neck and lumbar spine than controls (4.5% and 3.1%, respectively), and significantly greater 7-month changes for bone area (BA; cm²) at the femoral neck than controls (2.9%). After 7- months of detraining (no box jumping exercises) the jumping group maintained 4% greater BMC and 4% greater BA at the femoral neck than controls. By contrast, at the spine, gains in BMC from the intervention were not retained after an equivalent period of detraining. These data indicate that high-impact jumping enhances growth at the hip. Results/Conclusions Objective 2 (Chapter 5): Age, height, and weight were entered as predictor variables in order to create regression models for healthy, young Caucasian boys and girls. Of these, height and weight independently predicted femoral neck and total hip BMC in both boys (femoral neck: R²=.48, total hip: R²=.63) and girls (femoral neck: R²=.49, total hip R²=.65). Height best predicted spine BMC in boys (R²=.58), but both height and weight independently predicted spine BMC in girls (R²=.54). We report that height and weight not age, best predict bone mineral content at the hip and spine. Results/Conclusions Objective 3 (Chapter 6): Children responded similarly to the jumping program regardless of calcium intake. 73% of our population had dietary intakes of calcium that met the recommended values for their age group.
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