Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

An analysis of a computer-assisted laboratory method of instruction in elementary business statistics Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/h702q9097

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  • This was an experimental study designed to compare the effectiveness of computer-assisted laboratory instruction to teacher-assisted laboratory instruction based on student achievement in Elementary Business Statistics. Computer-assisted laboratory materials and an Elementary Business Statistics achievement test were evaluated. Procedures The setting of this experiment was at Southern Oregon State College, Ashland, Oregon, with classes in Elementary Business Statistics, during Winter quarter, 1975. Students were randomly assigned to either the teacher-assisted laboratory (control group) or the computer-assisted laboratory (experimental group). Both groups used the same textbook and received the same lectures. The teacher-assisted laboratory group received traditional classroom instruction and traditional laboratory instruction with laboratory assigned problems. The computer-assisted laboratory group received traditional classroom instruction and the same laboratory assigned problems, but had use of the computer to solve the problems. A fifty item criterion test was developed by the researcher and was checked for reliability and validity. The criterion test was used as the concomitant variable. The analysis of covariance controlled the effects on the students achievement of differences in aptitude as measured by this test. Findings Using the analysis of covariance to compare the control group and experimental group on the basis of the adjusted scores received on the criterion measure post-test, and controlling the students' scores on the pre-test of the criterion measure, the following findings were noted: The adjusted mean score achieved on the criterion measure was not significantly different for either group, whether as a total test or by sub-divided test categories. The computed F for the total criterion measure was .0009. For Category I of the criterion measure the computed F was .0543. For Category II of the criterion measure the computed F was .0160. None of the F-ratios were significant at the .05 level of confidence. A two factor analysis of variance compared mean scores based on test question categories of recall, manipulative and interpretive, and the treatments of a computer-assisted laboratory and teacher-assisted laboratory treatments and their interaction effects. The computed F for test question types of 176.0728 was significant at the .05 level. T-values comparing mean scores for recall and manipulative, and manipulative and interpretive type questions were found to be different. The computed [-value for teacher-assisted laboratory treated students, was -11.0105 and 10.5523 respectively. The computed t-values for computer-assisted laboratory treated students, was -11.4056 and 10.825 respectively. These t-values were significant at the .05 level. All other comparisons were not significant. Computed F values comparing treatment mean scores and interaction mean scores were not found significant at the .05 level of confidence. The criterion measure was found to have a correlation of .3578 and was significant at the .05 level of significance. Conclusions The following conclusions were drawn based on and supported by the data presented in this investigations 1) The criterion measure used in this study has reliability and is a good measure of achievement for the first six chapters of Elementary Business Statistics. 2) The students in Elementary Business Statistics who received the computer-assisted laboratory achieved as well as the students who received the teacher-assisted laboratory. 3) Through the use of a computer-assisted laboratory, it is possible for the student to achieve as well as students receiving a teacher-assisted laboratory and allow the student to choose the best time for laboratory instruction. 4) Handling larger enrollments in Elementary Business Statistics courses without additional staff will be possible chrough the use of computer-assisted laboratories.
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