In Vitro fermentation of dietary cellulose by human fecal microorganisms Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/hd76s270z

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The purpose of the study was to set up an in vitro model of the colon which would permit the analysis of cellulose fermentation by human colonic microflora. Studies of the degradation of polysaccharides by colonic bacteria may help to explain the observed physiological consequences of consuming dietary fiber common in foods. This study resulted in the use of a simple anaerobic batch fermentation system. It is assumed that the bacteria in fresh feces are representative of colonic bacteria. This batch culture system consists of the culture medium, the food fiber and the fecal inoculum. The fecal inoculum is prepared from freshly voided feces from a single individual. The food fiber is prepared from the vegetable/fruit starting material by repeated extraction with 90% ethanol, resulting in an alcohol insoluble residue(AIR). Extents of cellulose fermentation were measured after 4, 8, 12 and 24 hour fermentation periods at 37°C. The cellulose content of the samples before and after fermentation was determined by measuring the glucose yield (glucose oxidase assay) from an acid hydrolysate of the residue remaining after repeated acid detergent extractions. The extent of cellulose fermentation was then estimated by difference. The susceptibility to intestinal fermentation of the cellulose component of acorn squash and red beets was investigated using this model system. The cellulose content of squash and beet AIR was 26.71% ± 0.95% and 23.22% ± 0.89%, respectively. The extent of cellulose of fermentation of squash cellulose after 4, 8, 12 and 24 hrs incubation was 6.04% ± 0.69%, 10.58% ± 2.10%, 17.11% ± 6.37% and 96.18% ± 1.36%, respectively. The extent of fermentation of beet cellulose after 4, 8, 12 and 24 hrs incubation was 17.52% ± 1.83%, 23.52% ± 1.44%, 30.53% ± 4.12% and 96.06% ± 0.39%, respectively. The results indicate that the cellulose component of both vegetables is susceptible to considerable degradation within the human intestinal tract.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Scamax Scan+ V.1.0.32.10766 on a Scanmax 412CD by InoTec in PDF format. LuraDocument PDF Compressor V.5.8.71.50 used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-01-05T20:26:23Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 CHANGHUNG1991.pdf: 1182975 bytes, checksum: 160e63455590ff8caf3437fab66aa44b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-01-26T18:25:00Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 CHANGHUNG1991.pdf: 1182975 bytes, checksum: 160e63455590ff8caf3437fab66aa44b (MD5) Previous issue date: 1991-04-10
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-01-26T18:25:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 CHANGHUNG1991.pdf: 1182975 bytes, checksum: 160e63455590ff8caf3437fab66aa44b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (ecscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2011-12-28T20:56:05Z No. of bitstreams: 1 CHANGHUNG1991.pdf: 1182975 bytes, checksum: 160e63455590ff8caf3437fab66aa44b (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/08/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items