Roles of self-efficacy and social support on physical activity behavior in older adults with and without intellectual disabilities Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/hx11xh58s

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • In order to increase life expectancy without long periods of morbidity, physical activity should be a component in every older adult's lifestyle. It is proven that regular physical activity can improve health and quality of life for older adults; however, the older population is one of the most sedentary populations with less than 40% participating in any physical activity (Hughes, Seymour, Campbell, Whitelaw, & Bazzarre, 2009). In addition, physical activity patterns of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have not been the focus of empirical research studies. It has been shown that adults in this population are not participating in enough physical activity to receive health benefits (Stanish, Temple, & Frey, 2006). The key to determining why older adults are not participating in physical activity is to examine the barriers associated with physical limitations, and the psychological barriers that are limiting older adults with ID to initiate physical activity. The current study was designed to provide insight to why older adults, with and without intellectual disabilities, are not participating in sufficient amounts of physical activity to receive health benefits. The study provides valuable information about physical activity patterns of the older population with intellectual disabilities and information for future physical activity interventions specific to this aging population. The purpose of this study was to compare the roles of self-efficacy (SE) and social support (SS), as outlined in Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1987), on the physical activity (PA) behavior of older adults with and without intellectual disabilities. Methods: A total of 119 participants, older adults with ID (n= 35), younger adults with ID (n= 49), and older adults without ID (n= 34), completed validated scales, SS and SE for Physical Activity Participation (Peterson et al., 2009), and wore a pedometer (OmronHJ-720ITC) and accelerometer (GT3X-ActiGraph) for seven consecutive days. Analysis/ Results: Correlation coefficients and one-way ANOVAs with Bonferroni technique were calculated to examine the relationships and differences between study variables. Physical activity level was significantly different among groups for both pedometer walking steps (F= 5.547, p<.01) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (F= 6.633, p<.01). Older adults with ID had significantly lower walking steps (3864 ± 2061) than both comparative groups; older adults without ID (6109 ± 3031) and younger adults with ID (5926 ±2975). The results in average minutes per day of MVPA are as follows: younger adults with ID =40 ± 35 minutes, older adults with ID =15± 17 minutes, and older adults without ID =34 ± 31 minutes. Older adults with ID had significantly less MVPA than younger adults with ID. SE was significantly different among groups, F =11.883, p <.001. SE was significantly higher for older adults without ID (15.82 ±2.35) compared to younger (12.56 ± 3.75) and older adults with ID (12.38 ± 3.61). SS from family and SS from peers were also significantly difference among groups (F =4.592, p= <.05; F = 4.812, p= <.01). Older adults with ID had significantly lower SS from family (9.41 ±3.92) compared to younger adults with ID (11.82 ± 3.60). Younger adults with ID had significantly higher SS from peers (9.78 ±2.89) than older adults without ID (7.94 ±2.37). Conclusion: Older adults with ID need programs to facilitate higher SE to empower them to participate in PA. Health promotion interventions should include strategies to increase perceived personal skills, which is a source of decreased efficacy for those with ID (Temple, 2009). Additionally, interventions should focus on decreasing negative supports for physical activity and creating better role models for those aging with ID. Incorporating both those with ID and their supports may be an optimal way to change PA behavior.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Rights Statement
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-01-19T16:55:07Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DixonAliciaM2011.pdf.pdf: 751750 bytes, checksum: cb187bf5e890a9032f69e71ba23dca0d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-01-19T21:33:34Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 DixonAliciaM2011.pdf.pdf: 751750 bytes, checksum: cb187bf5e890a9032f69e71ba23dca0d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Alicia Dixon (dixona@onid.orst.edu) on 2011-01-07T16:58:08Z No. of bitstreams: 1 DixonAliciaM2011.pdf.pdf: 751750 bytes, checksum: cb187bf5e890a9032f69e71ba23dca0d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-01-19T21:33:34Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DixonAliciaM2011.pdf.pdf: 751750 bytes, checksum: cb187bf5e890a9032f69e71ba23dca0d (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items