Evaluation of shrimp and crab processing waste as a feed supplement for mink (Mustela vison) Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/jd473044b

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  • Three products derived from shrimp processing waste (Pandalus jordani) and a protein concentrate extracted from king crab waste (Paralithodes camschatica) were evaluated as feed supplements for standard dark and sapphire pelter mink (Mustela vison) replacing approximately 10 and/or 20 percent of the protein in a standard wet diet (33 percent protein) on an equal-protein basis. Partial mean analyses of waste products were as follows: untreated shrimp waste (25.5 percent corrected crude protein (CCP), 14.4 percent calcium, 19.3 percent chitin); shrimp meal (26.6 percent CCP, 13.8 percent calcium, 17.6 percent chitin); sieved shrimp meal (34.0 percent CCP, 10.3 percent calcium, 10.6 percent chitin); and crab protein concentrate (67.1 percent CCP, 0.1 percent calcium, trace chitin). Mink of both sexes and strains fed crustacean waste diets generally showed lower final weights and weight gains and increased feed consumption as compared to control groups fed a standard ration. These effects were most pronounced in males and, with the exception of the 20 percent protein replacement level (PRL) shrimp meal group, appeared to result primarily from the lower fat concentrations of the test diets. Significantly lower weight gains of males (P<.01 darks, P<.05 sapphires) on the 20 percent PRL shrimp meal diet appeared to be related to an excessive amount of dietary calcium (Ca/P = 3.48), resulting from shrimp waste supplementation, interfering with nutrient utilization. Pelt sizes and pelt weights varied directly with final body weights. General condition and fur color and quality were not appreciably affected. It is concluded crustacean waste products could be used satisfactorily as protein supplements for mink providing the protein and energy concentration of the diet is maintained at a sufficient level and dietary calcium does not become excessive. The Ca/P ratio of the diet (Ca/P I. 2) is suggested as a guideline for determining the maximum level of crustacean waste supplementation. From an economic standpoint, wet-ground shrimp waste is probably the only shellfish waste product potentially valuable as a mink feed in the Pacific Northwest at the present time.
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