Mathematical problem solving processes of Thai gifted students Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/jh343w62b

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  • The purpose of this study was to examine the problem solving processes of Thai gifted students when they solved non-routine mathematical problems. The research questions guiding the study were: (1) What is the nature of the problem solving processes that Thai gifted students use as they engage in solving non-routine mathematical problems? (2) What metacognitive behaviors do Thai gifted students exhibit when engaged in mathematical problem solving? Five Thai gifted students who were eligible for the Thai Mathematical Olympiad project and met the selection criteria participated in this study. Each student practiced the think aloud method before solving three mathematical problems individually. The problems were non-routine problems that focused on number theory, combinatorics, and geometry, respectively. The subjects worked on each problem separately and were interviewed at the end of each problem solving session. Data sources included videotapes of the think aloud and the interview sessions, students’ written solutions, and researcher’s field notes. These data were analyzed using the within-case and cross-case techniques. Data gathered were also categorized using a constant comparative method to conceptualize a model of problem solving process.Overall, the participants solved Problem One and Problem Two without hesitation, although some did not completely solve Problem One. In spite of the fact that two students had some difficulty searching for a solution for Problem Three, all of the students eventually succeeded. The results generated a Thai model of problem solving process that detailed the students’ behaviors in each of four stages: understanding, planning, executing, and verifying. Their behaviors occurred in this model cycled back and forth among the four stages. It was apparent in each stage that the students understood when and how to apply their mathematical knowledge and strategies in their solutions. They also applied self-evaluation statements to monitor and evaluate themselves as problem solvers. The findings also provided five categories of emerging evidence related to the students’ problem solving processes: advanced mathematical knowledge, willingness to consider multiple alternative solution methods, recollection and willingness to consider prior knowledge and experiences, reliance on affect, and parental and teacher support.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2006-05-12T18:11:04Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Supattra' s dissertation_.pdf: 487198 bytes, checksum: 486d663d5475bb30b5814f27591bee19 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Supattra Pativisan (pativiss@onid.orst.edu) on 2006-05-12T04:37:41Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Supattra' s dissertation_.pdf: 487198 bytes, checksum: 486d663d5475bb30b5814f27591bee19 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2006-05-15T17:04:48Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Supattra' s dissertation_.pdf: 487198 bytes, checksum: 486d663d5475bb30b5814f27591bee19 (MD5)

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