The effectiveness of cockpit task management training on task prioritization performance in simulated flight Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/k0698c12w

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  • The cockpit is an environment in which many important tasks simultaneously compete for pilot attention. Cockpit Task Management (CTM) is the process by which pilots selectively attend to flight tasks in such a way as to safely and effectively complete a flight. CTM has been categorized as a mental function that is inherently well understood by pilots and almost always performed satisfactorily (for example, through the trained Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, Manage Systems hierarchy). However, there are documented instances, such as incident and accident reports, where tasks were not managed properly, resulting in an aircraft mishap. CTM involves the prioritization of flight tasks based on their importance to flight safety, urgency, and how well the tasks are actually being performed. Task prioritization errors occur when pilots do not give attention to a higher priority task (i.e., one more important to flight safety, one that is more urgent, or one that is currently not being performed satisfactorily) by attending to a lower priority task (i.e., one less critical to flight safety, one less urgent, or one that is already being performed well and is not in need of immediate attention). The goal of this thesis was to develop a CTM training program to aid pilots' task prioritization performance. Microsoft Flight Simulator 2000 with yoke, throttle, and rudder pedals, was used to assess pilot task prioritization performance before and after training. Three experimental groups were used: a control group (no training), descriptive group (CTM lecture training), and prescriptive group (CTM lecture training plus mnemonic procedure) to test the effectiveness of CTM training on task prioritization in simulated flight. Results showed that the prescriptive group improved in task prioritization performance in the post-training flight. Additionally, results showed that the descriptive and prescriptive groups both improved in memory recall (a second dependent measure). It was concluded that CTM training is effective on task prioritization performance.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-06-05T18:47:26Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 BisharaSaherA2002.pdf: 17924066 bytes, checksum: aeee185a293ef6019e72752858f9ce0e (MD5)

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