Why Women Endorse Ambivalent Sexism : Risks of Young Women's Enjoyment of Sexualization and the Protective Powers of Feminism Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/k0698c908

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  • Hostile sexism (HS) is an antagonistic attitude towards women; benevolent sexism (BS) is a positive attitude towards women that is sexist in terms of viewing women in restricted roles. HS and BS held simultaneously is defined as ambivalent sexism (AS). Despite negative outcomes associated with AS, BS, and HS, women on average report endorsing AS, BS, and HS. Our study examined the extent to which viewing and describing pictures of female celebrities in stereotypically feminine and counter-stereotypical forms influences young adult women’s endorsement of AS, BS, and HS. It was predicted that highly-feminine images would increase participants’ AS, BS, and HS while unfeminine images would decrease participants’ AS, BS, and HS. Participants were randomly assigned to view and describe a series of highly-feminine, unfeminine, or control (natural scenery) photos and complete pretest and posttest Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) measurements. Results indicated that women’s endorsement of AS, BS, and HS did not change significantly between any of the photo conditions, suggesting viewing and describing images of female celebrities did not impact women’s endorsement of AS, BS, or HS. However, we were able to identify psychological entitlement and enjoyment of sexualization as positively related constructs, and feminist identity as a negatively related construct to women’s endorsement of AS, BS, and HS. The importance and implications of identifying risk and protective factors on women’s endorsement of AS, BS, and HS are discussed.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Haley Allemand (allemanh@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-06-06T01:23:34ZNo. of bitstreams: 2license_rdf: 1223 bytes, checksum: d127a3413712d6c6e962d5d436c463fc (MD5)AllemandHaleyM2017.pdf: 756909 bytes, checksum: 02965359325fea8c9a7d8e88527ef30e (MD5)
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