Persistence of spatial distribution patterns of coastal cutthroat trout in a Cascade mountain stream Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/k3569646j

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  • Previous research in South Fork Hinkle Creek suggested that coastal cutthroat trout exhibit an aggregated spatial pattern across multiple spatial scales. To evaluate the persistence of the observed abundance patterns and identify factors that affect those patterns, half-duplex passive integrated transponders (PIT-tags) were implanted in 320 coastal cutthroat trout (> 100 mm, about age 1-plus fish) within our study sections, and in an additional 370 fish throughout the watershed. Nineteen habitat patches of high, or low relative fish abundance were delineated and monitored over a 13-month period. Seasonal habitat surveys quantified channel characteristics in each patch. Immigration and emigration were monitored using stationary and portable PIT-tag antennas along 2 km of stream, including mainstem and tributary habitats. In general, habitat patches that supported a high abundance of coastal cutthroat trout experienced less immigration and more consistent fish abundance. Mainstem study sections maintained the initial relative abundance patterns, but abundances in the tributary sections shifted during the study period. Abundances of PIT-tagged coastal cutthroat trout were consistent over time in mainstem habitats, even though some originally marked fish moved away. In tributary sections relative abundances were much more variable and few originally marked fish remained. The number of instream boulders was positively correlated with fish abundance, pool habitats, and section fidelity of individual fish in mainstem study sections. A majority (70%) of fish detected moving traveled 25 m or less during any season. The greatest number of fish moved during the spring, and the fewest during the winter. Timing of fish movements were not specifically related to high stream discharge or storm events, and fish appeared to move in proportion to the available seasonal discharge.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Marc Novick (novickm@onid.orst.edu) on 2006-01-11T02:43:38Z No. of bitstreams: 1 NovickFinalMsThesis2.pdf: 740402 bytes, checksum: 0a496c67ee7de2f79c4e2a42ea5024c5 (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2006-01-12T20:37:07Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 NovickFinalMsThesis2.pdf: 740402 bytes, checksum: 0a496c67ee7de2f79c4e2a42ea5024c5 (MD5)

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