Planning for controllable network devices in power transmission systems Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/k643b4770

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  • The full capacity of the existing transmission lines is often underutilized due to the system stability requirements. Controllable network devices represent the effective means of improving the system stability, and their deployment allows better use of the existing transmission facilities and can help to avoid construction of new lines. This dissertation addresses system analysis and modeling of controllable network devices. Transient angle stability is one of the major requirements limiting transfer capability of the power transmission systems. The theoretical concepts of transient angle controllability using controllable network devices are considered in this dissertation. The main results are derived for a general transmission network structure and applied to series and shunt compensators as well as braking resistors. The proposed approach allows to quantify controllability and to relate it to the control device size, type and location in the transmission network. Transient stability controllers are needed to maximize the device effect on the transient angle stability enhancement. The transient stability controller functional structure is discussed and the design requirements for each component are specified. The examples of controller designs are presented. Emerging technologies such as Thyristor-Controlled Series Compensators and Synchronous Voltage Sources offer superior control capabilities and performance characteristics as compared to conventional compensators. Unlike conventional compensators, the new controllable network devices are very complex dynamical systems and require more comprehensive modeling for time-domain studies and controller designs. Detailed models of a Thyristor-Controlled Series Compensator and a Synchronous Voltage Source for powerflow, transient stability, and electro-magnetic transient studies are presented. Finally, a detailed planning study for increasing transfer capability of the Montana transmission system using controlled series compensation is presented. A variety of design and performance requirements is considered in this study, which makes it a useful reference for similar planning projects.
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