Performance and parameter prediction of large synchronous machines from physical dimensions Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/kh04ds46m

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  • A project funded by the Southern California Edison (SCE) Company, Research Center of Irwindale, California, has supported the development of a performance and parameter prediction software program for use during the refurbishment of large synchronous machines, turbine generators, and synchronous condensers. The computer program was developed for SCE to allow user friendly input of a machine's physical parameters such as pole/field/winding/stator dimensions, type of steel, and other related information in order to calculate the machine's reactances, time constants, and performance curves. The program also allows some degree of design calculation to be performed in order to meet certain design criteria where appropriate. The theory behind the calculations upon which the electrical calculations are built is obtained primarily from literature published in the early 1950's. Since that time, however, machine design has progressed into ever larger generators, most often in the hundreds of Megawatt range with some units exceeding one thousand Megawatts. This size increase has established the practice of winding the stator coils into parallel circuits to maintain acceptable flux and generated voltage levels. These design practices justify a re-examination of the traditional methods used to calculate a machine's reactances and time constants. Accordingly, the use of parallel circuits in the stator winding and their effect on machine parameters has not, to this author's knowledge, been addressed in public literature. These issues are exam fled and modifications to the traditional formulas have been derived for the reactances along with the process of carrying out the calculations on a per pole basis. In addition, the calculation of the parameter and performance equations of a machine are suitable for implementation on a computer due to the length and often iterative calculation procedures. The procedures used to calculate the capability and saturation curves directly from the machine's physical dimensions are developed. During development of the program a forty megawatt generator was measured in order to test and debug the program. Results of this test case are presented and compared to test values obtained at the time of the generator's installation.
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