The influence of sex, migration distance, and latitude on expression of anadromy in Oncorhynchus mykiss Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/kk91fp18n

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  • The evolution and maintenance of multiple phenotypes within populations is an interesting evolutionary and ecological question, and is becoming increasingly important for the restoration and conservation of partially migratory species. In particular, why individuals adopt a particular phenotype has been the focus of numerous research efforts. In the partially migratory species Oncorhynchys mykiss (commonly known as steelhead and rainbow trout), I found that sex plays a strong role in whether an individual adopts an anadromous or resident life history. I observed a higher frequency of females adopting the anadromous tactic throughout the species range, and I attributed this to the relationship between body size and reproductive success in females that is not present in males. I did not observe differences in female bias along gradients of latitude or migration distance, and I hypothesize that while the frequency of tactics among populations may change along these gradients, either the change is equal between males and females, or an interaction of latitude and migration distance may control changes. I did not observe a corresponding male bias in the one resident population I sampled, and suggest that this is the result of a high frequency of residents in that population. I propose that sex ratios could be a valuable metric for measuring frequency of life-history tactics in populations and could facilitate the investigation into the controls of life-history tactics across broad scales.
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