Self concept and perceptions of skilled occupations of selected adult metis in rural northern Alberta Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/kk91fq09w

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  • The purpose of the study was to answer two questions: (1) what are the self concepts and (2) what are the perceptions of skilled occupations of adult Metis in rural northern Alberta? The sample consisted of adult students attending Academic Upgrading programs at Alberta Vocational Centres located in three regions of rural northern Alberta as well as comparable subjects of different ethnicities. The computer form of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (TSCS) and the Perceptions of Skilled Occupations, an instrument designed for this study, were used in the collection of data. Special concern was placed on explaining the objectives to the staff and subjects at the Vocational Centres. Careful attention was given to the test environment. This was extremely important because of the known "questionnaire reluctance" of Native people and the fact that a few would not be able to understand the questions despite the assistance that was readily available. Stress was placed on the necessity for sincere responses. The .05 level of significance was used for all tests which included one-way analysis of variance, Student-Newman-Keuls test, Pearson correlation and chi-square test of assocation. The findings of the study revealed that there were no significant differences in self concepts and perceptions of skilled occupations among adult Metis, Status Indians and non-Native subjects from rural northern Alberta. There were significant differences in the total self concept scores and various subscale scores of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale among Metis when location was considered. Two locations showed consistent but opposite patterns of high and low levels of scores in total self esteem and other aspects of the self concept. There was a significant although weak relationship between Metis levels of scores in self concept and perceptions of skilled occupations. Therefore, it was concluded that: 1. The self concept level of the Metis subjects in general was very low and similar low levels were revealed for non-Natives and Status Indians. 2. Ethnicity was not a significant factor in the level of self concept. 3. Low socioeconomic status and continual dependency on social assistance appeared to be associated with negative self images. 4. Evidence would indicate that the differences in the levels of self concept among Metis by location were related to the differences in environmental factors. 5. The Tennessee Self Concept Scale and Perceptions of Skilled Occupations, although significantly related, appeared to be measuring different elements of the self. The findings have important implication's for manpower plannin types of educational programs required and vocational counseling. Recommendations for further study included replication of this study with Metis in northern areas of other provinces and with urban Metis. The Perceptions of Skilled Occupations survey form requires further testing especially with adult subjects enrolled in a broader scope of training programs and with more varied levels of self concept.
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