A study of conflict in natural resource use: evaluation of recreational benefits as related to changes in water quality Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/m039k803k

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The evaluation of social investment in water pollution control has been retarded by a lack of methodology with which to evaluate the direct benefits. The objective of this dissertation was to develop theory and methodology for estimating direct recreational benefits associated with the protection of sport fisheries. An inter-disciplinary case study of pulp mill waste disposal alternatives at Yaquina Bay, Oregon, provided the setting for research. Methodology for estimating direct benefits was based on a bio-economic model of sports angling. A theory of angler demand behavior was developed, with special consideration of the "quality" of the recreational experience. This quality factor was specified as "angler success per unit of angling effort". The aggregate relationship between these two variables in a sport fishery was termed a "success-effort relationship". Conventional demand relationships between quantity, price, and income were also postulated. A biological production function for a sport fishery was envisioned between inputs of angler effort and an output, angler yield. The marginal product was termed a biological "success" function. Equilibrium levels of success and effort are determined by the biological "success" and behavioral "success-effort" relationships. Water pollution would reduce the level of water quality, lower the biological production function, and reduce the equilibrium levels of success and effort. The reduced level of effort would be manifested in a decreased net economic value of the sport fishery. Direct benefits of water pollution control would be equal to the averted reduction in net economic value. Data for empirical estimation of the biological "success", behavioral "success-effort", and conventional demand functions were obtained from a field survey of Yaquina Bay sports anglers, two related mail surveys, and secondary sources. Estimates of these three types of relationships were made for each of three major sport fisheries in the estuary. The "success-effort" relationships were estimated by multiple regression analysis of time-series and cross-sectional data. The level of salmon angling effort was significantly responsive to success changes at fisheries similar to Yaquina Bay. The degree of response was expressed in terms of a "success elasticity". Two short-run success elasticity estimates (.375 and .584) were made for offshore salmon angling at Newport, and a long-run estimate of .999 was made for off-shore salmon angling at Winchester Bay. Bottomfish anglers at Yaquina Bay were not significantly responsive to success changes in time-series analyses, although the results of a mail questionnaire which posed hypothetical "success-effort" situations indicated that the response would be greater if angler knowledge of current success could be increased. Cross-sectional analyses of these data also revealed that increased angler incomes and distances from the fishery were reflected in larger success elasticities. Demand equations were estimated for each sport fishery. Net economic value of the total Yaquina Bay sport fishery was estimated to be $22,747 per year. A non-discriminating monopolistic owner of the fisheries could maximize revenues at this level by charging $1.50 per angler day for salmon and bottomfish angling, and $1.00 per day for clam digging. Negative income elasticities for bottomfish angling and clam digging prevented the projected yearly rate of increase in net economic value (2.25 percent) from being larger. The methodology for estimating direct benefits was illustrated with a hypothetical water pollution control alternative at Yaquina Bay. The "success elasticities" were used to reduce each quantity observation in the demand models, and estimation of the revised demand equations facilitated a comparison of net economic values with and without water pollution control. The methodology will be used later to evaluate direct benefits from each pollution control alternative at Yaquina Bay.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Moochrome, 8-bit Grayscale) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Digital Production(digitalproduc@gmail.com) on 2010-09-27T18:27:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 StevensJoeBruce1966.pdf: 1284146 bytes, checksum: 834383f03b93c7c7c443c2472c1ddd31 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2010-09-28T16:52:09Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 StevensJoeBruce1966.pdf: 1284146 bytes, checksum: 834383f03b93c7c7c443c2472c1ddd31 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-09-28T16:52:08Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 StevensJoeBruce1966.pdf: 1284146 bytes, checksum: 834383f03b93c7c7c443c2472c1ddd31 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Douglas Schulte (douglasschulte@gmail.com) on 2010-09-27T18:05:15Z No. of bitstreams: 1 StevensJoeBruce1966.pdf: 1284146 bytes, checksum: 834383f03b93c7c7c443c2472c1ddd31 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items