Identification of factors influencing high school students in selecting an occupational program major in an Oregon community college Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/m326m435w

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  • The study was devoted to formulating answers to the following questions: 1. What factors did students report to be influential in their choice of a community college major ? 2. What factors influenced students in the selection of a community college to attend? 3. What factors influenced students to continue their education within the first year following high school graduation. 4. Were the rank order of factor groups correlated by student's sex, by high school background and by when the selection of a community college major was made? The study included students of associated degree occupational programs from 11 of Oregon's 12 community colleges. Twenty winter term (1970) occupational classes were selected and surveyed. The 125 students from these classes that had graduated from high school in 1969 served as the population for the questionnaire survey. From the 125 student population, 34 students were selected for indepth interviews. A profile was developed including the students' high school background and the time they made their choice of an occupational major. The findings indicated a student's choice of a community college major is influenced most by his "interest in the subject matter, " "employment potential, " "parents, " "previous experiences on a job" and "influences of the high school. " A rather consistent significant correlation of rank orders of factor categories existed between all groups in their responses to influences in selecting a community college major. In selecting a community college to attend, students are influenced most by the "convenience in location of the college to their home, " by "tuition rates" and the "limitation of personal and family finances. " Several factors influenced students in reaching a decision to continue their education in a community college during the first year following high school. "Parents, " the "desire for self-improvement, " "employment potential, " the "lack of anything else to do, " "high school counselors" and "high school classmates" were the more influential factors in this decision. The males are also influenced to choose to attend a community college right after high school to avoid the draft. Implications for future action were developed and are included in the study.
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