Genetic-protein level interaction in growth and carcass traits of market hogs Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/mc87pv26x

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  • Progeny from three sires of differing genetic background were divided within litters by sex and placed on either a 15 or 19% protein ration. The test period began when the experimental animals weighed 60 pounds and continued until they were slaughtered at 225 pounds. This test period was divided into three growth periods: 60 to 115 pounds; 115 to 170 pounds; and 170 to 225 pounds. Pen feed consumption was recorded and weekly weighings were made from which average daily gain and feed efficiency were calculated. Carcass data were collected only on the males, with a few exceptions, and consisted of loin eye area, ham weight, loin weight, carcass length, carcass backfat, and a color and marbling index score. Live animal data showed that a high protein ration gave additional growth (P < . 025) and feed efficiency only during the early stages of growth. Sire effects also were most evident in the early growth period (P < . 01) while sex effects showed males gained faster (P < .01) and deposited more backfat (P < .01) during all three growth periods when compared to the females. Backfat thickness measured at 170 and 225 pounds showed no differences due to sire or ration. No interactions were observed for average daily gain, feed efficiency, or backfat thickness regardless of the feeding period studied. Carcass data showed the higher protein ration produced no significant effects but did cause minor improvements in loin eye area, carcass backfat depth, ham weight and loin weight. Sire effects were significant for loin eye area (P < .01) and ham weight (P < .01) but were not significant for the other carcass traits measured. No interactions were found between sire and ration for any of the carcass traits studied. Cost analysis showed that the higher protein ration did not produce enough favorable live animal and carcass results to pay for the extra protein costs.
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