A study of the whole job (multi-position) approach as compared to the traditional (single-position) approach in the development of arc welding skills Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/mp48sg478

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  • The major consideration of this study was the testing of the superiority of the whole or part method for developing basic arc welding skills. Data were also generated which facilitated investigation of: (1) the relationship of welding skill development to cognitive attainment of welding information as measured by welding proficiency posttest scores and written test scores, respectively; (2) a comparison of skill development among three levels of students grouped according to welding proficiency pretest scores; and (3) a comparison of welding skill development of students in separated and mixed (whole or part method) welding sections. Fifty-five students comprised the population for this study. Subjects were selected from beginning welding students enrolled in day or evening programs at Everett Community College during the Fall and Winter quarters of the 1971-72 school year. Students selected for participation were programmed through a 15-hour practice session running flat and overlapping flat beads. Students were tested and paired according to similarity of welding proficiency pre-test scores. Pairs were split or arbitrarily assigned to the whole or part method of learning. Four welding sections were homogeneous; that is, contained only whole- or part-method students. All other welding sections were heterogeneous; that is, both whole- and part-method students learning together. Three welding positions, horizontal, vertical, and overhead, were selected as the learning elements used to test the whole versus part method of learning. That concept was implemented by assigning students to one of two sequences. Whole-method, experimental students practiced a total of 45 hours. The welding practice sessions were divided into three equal parts, time-wise. Each student practiced one-third of each session on horizontal fillet welds, one-third on vertical fillet welds, and one-third on overhead fillet welds. This schedule was followed until 45 hours of practice were completed. Part-method, control students utilized the following sequence: (1) fifteen hours of welding practice on horizontal fillet welds, then (2) 15 hours of welding practice on vertical fillet welds, and finally (3) 15 hours of welding practice on overhead fillet welds. Upon completion of a 45-hour practice schedule, all students made fillet weld test plates in the three positions and were tested on the cognitive aspects of welding which were judged relevant. The welding proficiency and cognitive test scores provided the data for the statistical test of each of the hypotheses. Within the limits of this study, the following conclusions are evident concerning the hypotheses: 1. Whole (experimental) and part (control) method students demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the level of welding proficiency. 2. Students who scored highest on the pre-test demonstrated statistically significant higher welding proficiency post-test scores than students who scored lowest on the pre-test. 3. Whole-method students in mixed classes demonstrated statistically higher welding proficiency post-test scores than their counterparts in segregated classes. 4. There was practically no linear relationship or commonality between welding proficiency post-test scores and cognitive test scores.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Kirsten Clark(kcscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-12-03T16:03:03Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 StemmerRoland1973.pdf: 812834 bytes, checksum: 674a12c9b904c0ebec5d326bc1345ba7 (MD5)
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