The contribution of snacking to the diets of freshman college women Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/ms35tb67s

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The nutritional impact of snacking on the diets of female, freshman college students between the ages of 17 and 20 years was assessed. Sixty-five women living in freshman residence halls at Oregon State University recorded their dietary intakes and eating habits for four days. Questionnaires concerning eating and activity patterns were also completed. Dietary intakes were analyzed for energy (kcal), protein, calcium, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and ascorbic acid. The nutrient contents of snacks, meals, and nutrient supplements consumed by the subjects were calculated. Nutrient densities (nutrient/1000 kcal) of meals and snacks were also calculated for the above nutrients. All subjects received a Dietary Adequacy Score, which was computed from their mean daily intake over the four-day period, by assigning one point for each nutrient consumed at or above two-thirds of the RDA. All but one subject snacked during the four-day recording period. The subjects consumed a mean of 1.54 snacks daily, with means of 0.19 morning, 0.47 afternoon, and 0.88 evening snacks. With the exception of ascorbic acid, the mean nutrient desities of snacks were significantly (p<0.01) lower than that of meals. The mean nutrient densities of snacks were well below the RDA/1000 kcal for all of the calculated nutrients, again, with the exception of ascorbic acid. Snacks contributed about 20 percent of the mean total energy intake; the proportions supplied by snacks to the mean nutrient intakes were considerably lower (8 to 13 percent). Meal frequency was negatively correlated with snack frequency (r= -.24, p<0.05) and snack energy intake (r= -.40, p<0.01). Lunch was the meal most negatively correlated with snacking frequency (r = .33, p<0.01) and snack energy intake ( r= -.37, p<0.01). By examining when snacking and when missed meals occurred, it appears that snacks were often consumed as a result of missed meals rather than the cause of them. Breakfast was missed most often and dinner least often with snacking occurring most often in the evening and afternoon. Snacks consumed at these times would not have interfered with either lunch or breakfast. Despite the relatively poor nutritional value of snack foods eaten by the subjects (as evidenced by the low nutrient densities), snacks actually improved the Dietary Adequacy Scores of 28 subjects. However, 16 subjects exceeded the RDA for energy with the addition of snacks, eight of whom were not included in the above group of 28 with the improved Dietary Adequacy Scores. But in all, 20 subjects (31 percent) had their Dietary Adequacy Scores improved by snacks, without exceeding the 2100 kcal RDA for energy. The foods most commonly eaten as snacks were (in descending order): cookies, cake and pastries; candy; fruit; dairy desserts; popcorn; crackers, chips etc.; soft drinks; and alcoholic beverages.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Scamax Scan+ V.1.0.32.10766 on a Scanmax 412CD by InoTec in PDF format. LuraDocument PDF Compressor V.5.8.71.50 used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-12-12T20:48:34Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HOUGHTONLESLIE1981.pdf: 1224801 bytes, checksum: af184f3d8446498c2787c5d859cafa9e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-12-12T20:48:34Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 HOUGHTONLESLIE1981.pdf: 1224801 bytes, checksum: af184f3d8446498c2787c5d859cafa9e (MD5) Previous issue date: 1981-12-15
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-12-08T18:29:52Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HOUGHTONLESLIE1981.pdf: 1224801 bytes, checksum: af184f3d8446498c2787c5d859cafa9e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (ecscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2011-12-08T16:16:04Z No. of bitstreams: 1 HOUGHTONLESLIE1981.pdf: 1224801 bytes, checksum: af184f3d8446498c2787c5d859cafa9e (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/03/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items