Attractant, behavioral, and toxicological studies of Fannia canicularis L. (Diptera : Muscidae) in association with a mink fur farm Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/n296x1568

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  • Fannie canicularis is concentrated in areas where animal husbandry is practiced and frequently comprises more than 50 percent of the fly population. There is a need for more critical fly control where suburban expansion has invaded animal raising regions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of organophosphate insecticides in controlling Fannie canicularis associated with a mink fur farm in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Studies of population dispersal and attractants also were conducted to provide biological information for more efficient control. Acute and chronic tests of insecticide toxicity to mink resulted in the selection of ronnel, malathion, and dimethoate as being relatively non-toxic to these animals. Ronnel and dimethoate at one percent concentrations produced rapid knock-down of Fannie canicularis held captive in large cages. Residual fly mortality did not decrease rapidly over a two week period. Ronnel was consistently more toxic than dimethoate. Malathion toxicity was low and resistance indications were present. Fannia canicularis was not attracted in any significant quantity to a selection of candidate substances using a Mclndoo olfactometer. Blacklights stimulated Fannia canicularis and induced a positive response which decreased as natural lighting increased. There was no attraction under field conditions, and stimulation occurred only when the flies were held in cages of approximately 12 cubic feet or less. Emergence trap data indicated that mink manure was not a prime breeding area for Fannia canicularis. Mink manure would not sustain the adult flies in the laboratory and granulated white sugar was required. A swarming male to female population ratio of 11:1 and a resting population ratio of 1:2 was observed during the day at the mink farm. The total day population was estimated at twice that of the night, there being three times as many males present during the day. Fannia canicularis is more sensitive to changing air currents than Musca domestica which may account for the erratic flight of the former when swarming.
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