Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Distribution and Ecological roles of arthropods in dead woody materials of ponderosa pine forests, northern California Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/n583xx50p

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • This dissertation describes arthropod responses to and effects on decay processes in ponderosa pine, a dominant forest canopy tree in northern California. We used both descriptive and experimental field techniques to establish how arthropod assemblages depend on and are important to the disintegration of woody structures in forests of this type. The first study used pitfall traps placed within and on the outsides of fallen, large old ponderosa pine trees to establish the effects of microenvironments created during tree death. We studied the internal and external structures of fallen trees as well as the forest floor in canopy gaps and in the surrounding undisturbed forest. Five trees were surveyed, representing a decay sequence from newly dead and with distinct canopy gap, to well-decayed with recovering canopy. Arthropod assemblages were distinct among the different microenvironments, but were less so with increasing tree/gap age. Differences between tree and soil faunae decreased with increasing decay, as did the differences between gap and non-gap catches from the forest floor. The second study used experimental exclusion techniques to examine how longitudinal (bark beetle) and transverse (woodboring) insect colonists could influence rates of mass loss and carbon respiration from young, dead ponderosa pine. We found that both groups enhanced the prevalence of staining fungi in the sapwood, which in turn was negatively related to the degree of structural failure in the sapwood, associated with decay fungi. Carbon respiration was positively related to sapwood structural failure and we believe that the two insect groups act in concert to suppress wood decomposition in this system. This is contrary to prevailing wisdom among forest practitioners who have suspected that decay and insect activity are positively correlated, but in agreement with laboratory studies showing antagonism between stain and decay fungi. Lastly, we observed that neither forest harvesting nor fire had strong effects on the development of exemplar taxa from decay communities in ponderosa pine two years post-treatment. Though time since treatment did affect all functional groups inside of logs, only undisturbed old-growth treatments showed a reduced variability in composition, leading us to suspect effects to emerge at longer time intervals.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 8-bit Grayscale) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kaylee Patterson (kdpscanner@gmail.com) on 2012-06-27T18:48:04Z No. of bitstreams: 1 LemieuxJeffreyP2004.pdf: 5891446 bytes, checksum: 3ab7a90eb03d4ab623d97b288fa534fd (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-07-12T19:02:43Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LemieuxJeffreyP2004.pdf: 5891446 bytes, checksum: 3ab7a90eb03d4ab623d97b288fa534fd (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-07-12T19:06:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LemieuxJeffreyP2004.pdf: 5891446 bytes, checksum: 3ab7a90eb03d4ab623d97b288fa534fd (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-07-12T19:06:44Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 LemieuxJeffreyP2004.pdf: 5891446 bytes, checksum: 3ab7a90eb03d4ab623d97b288fa534fd (MD5) Previous issue date: 2003-06-25

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items