Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Evaluation of Oregon Tack Coat Performance to Reduce Tracking and Increase Interlayer Shear Strength of Asphalt Pavements Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/n583xz337

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  • CSS-1H is the most commonly used slow-setting emulsion grade in Oregon. “New” engineered emulsions were recently developed in Oregon to reduce tracking, the pick-up of tack coats by construction vehicle tires during construction activities, and increase interlayer shear strength (ISS), the amount of adhesive bond present between layers of asphalt pavement. Tracking reduces the amount of tack coat in particular areas and creates a non-uniform tack coat distribution between two pavement layers. The non-uniform tack coat distribution leads to localized distresses and significant reductions in interlayer shear strength, leading to complete failure of the pavement structure. The magnitude of this effect and performance of the tack coat is dependent on tack coat type, residual application rate, temperature, existing surface condition (cracked, milled, overlay), and curing time. For this reason, reducing tracking and increasing interlayer shear strength between pavement layers becomes vital to the longevity of the pavement structure. The performance (ability to reduce tracking and increase ISS) of these emulsions, most effective application rates, the effects of pavement surface texture and traffic on ISS, and curing times were evaluated in this study. Results show that lower temperatures and increased application rates lead to longer curing times, while higher wind speeds will reduce curing times. The results indicate that tracking will decrease with increased curing time. Results show that a positive correlation between pavement surface texture and interlayer shear strength exists and that milled surfaces provide significantly higher ISS than non-milled overlay surfaces. The results indicated that there are positive correlations between rheological tests and interlayer shear strengths from field cores. The results also showed significant variances in application rates by distributor trucks. Hence there is a need for unified guidelines on tack coat QC/QA and construction practices.
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