The relationship of dietary intake to blood vitamin B₆ in oral contraceptive users Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/nz806402t

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Oral contraceptive (OC) users frequently have lower vitamin B₆ status than non-oral contraceptive (NOC) users. However, normal dietary intake, a possible factor, has not been adequately studied. Therefore, 26 OC users and 25 NOC users, of college age, were compared with respect to dietary intake of vitamin B₆ and blood vitamin B₆ levels. OC users had been taking "the pill" for at least five months and NOC users had not taken any estrogen-progestin hormones for at least five months. A 72-hour continuous dietary intake record, kept by each subject, was used to calculate intakes of vitamin B₆ and nine other nutrients. Subjects consumed self-selected diets and none had used vitamin B₆ supplements within two weeks of this study. Intakes of all nutrients studied were comparable between the two groups. The mean intakes exceeded the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for all nutrients except iron, calories and vitamin B₆. The mean intake of vitamin B₆ (1.4 [plus or minus] 0.5 mg/day for OC and 1.6 [plus or minus] 0.5 mg/day for NOC) did not differ significantly between the two groups. The RDA for this age group is 2.0 mg/day of vitamin B₆. The mean protein intakes were not significantly different for OC versus NOC users (72.6 [plus or minus] 19.4 g/day for OC and 66.9 [plus or minus] 13.6 g/day for NOC). The ratio of vitamin B₆ to protein was calculated for each subject. Mean ratios were 0.020 [plus or minus] 0.004 for OC and 0.025 [plus or minus] 0.01 for NOC users. This difference was significant at p<0.05. The mean ratio for both groups exceeded 0.019, which is considered to be adequate. Fasting blood samples were collected during the luteal phase (NOC) or after seven days of the pill cycle for 0C users. These samples were analyzed for whole blood and plasma (by Lind, 1980) vitamin B₆, using a microbiological assay (S.uvarum). These values were used to calculate vitamin B₆ levels in the red blood cell (RBC). A significant difference (p [less than or equal to] 0.05) was found between the mean level of RBC vitamin B₆ in the 0C users versus the NOC (12.4 [plus or minus] 5.4 ng/ml for 0C and 16.8 [plus or minus] 8.5 ng/ml for NOC). Plasma vitamin B₆ concentrations were also significantly different between the two groups. The mean ratio of plasma vitamin B₆ to RBC vitamin B₆ was not statistically different between 0C and NOC users. A questionnaire was used to compare the subject groups with respect to exercise, alcohol intake, general health, general vitamin B₆ intake and other indices. With the exception of alcohol intake, the mean scores for both groups, from this questionnaire, were similar. 0C users had a significantly higher intake of alcohol than NOC users, as measured by the questionnaire. However, the actual alcohol intake from the dietary record did not differ statistically between the two groups. The lack of a significant difference in vitamin B₆ intake, coupled with significantly different blood vitamin B₆ levels for 0C versus NOC users, tends to indicate that the 0C may be altering vitamin B₆ metabolism. Estrogens may cause a redistribution of vitamin B₆ in various body pools, with the vitamin leaving the blood and entering other tissues. Blood levels are generally used to determine vitamin status. By this assessment, 0C users have a lower vitamin B₆ status than controls. It is recommended that 0C users be encouraged to consume at least 2.0 mg/day of vitamin B₆ in their normal diets.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Scamax Scan+ V.1.0.32.10766 on a Scanmax 412CD by InoTec in PDF format. LuraDocument PDF Compressor V.5.8.71.50 used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-02-03T16:39:10Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 HOAGLUNDJUDITH1980.pdf: 953773 bytes, checksum: b53838c63c60b8b69ce5650c46c79b6d (MD5) Previous issue date: 1980-06-06
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (ecscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2011-12-08T16:01:05Z No. of bitstreams: 1 HOAGLUNDJUDITH1980.pdf: 953773 bytes, checksum: b53838c63c60b8b69ce5650c46c79b6d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-12-08T16:08:59Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HOAGLUNDJUDITH1980.pdf: 953773 bytes, checksum: b53838c63c60b8b69ce5650c46c79b6d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-02-03T16:39:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HOAGLUNDJUDITH1980.pdf: 953773 bytes, checksum: b53838c63c60b8b69ce5650c46c79b6d (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 10/24/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items