The identification of verbal, handwriting, and written composition skills and the level of those skills required by entry-level industrial mechanics Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/pg15bh85k

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the importance and the frequency of use of certain communication skills to job-entrylevel mechanics as assessed by employers, educators at various levels, and entry-level industrial mechanics. The study was conducted in Lane County, Oregon. Communication skills investigated for importance and for frequency of use were: verbal, handwriting, and composition skills. The following null hypothesis was tested: There is no significant difference among the means of the seven groups, or, the seven groups agree on the importance and the frequency of use of the investigated communication skills. After rejection of the original (null) hypothesis, a Least Significant Difference (L.S.D.) test was used to test the following six a priori subhypotheses: 1. Do employers (Group 2) agree with workers (Group 1) on necessary communication skills and level of those skills? 2. Do educators on necessary skills? 3. Do educators on necessary skills? 4. Do educators on necessary skills? 5. Do educators on necessary skills? K-6 (Group 3) agree with workers (Group 1) communication skills and level of those 7-9 (Group 4) agree with workers (Group 1) communication skills and level of those 10-12 (Group 5) agree with workers (Group 1) communication skills and level of those 13-14 (Group 6) agree with workers (Group 1) communication skills and level of those 6. Do educators 14+ (Group 7) agree with workers (Group 1) on necessary communication skills? Conclusions 1. The seven groups do not agree in their assessment of the importance or the frequency of use by entrylevel workers of the communication skills investigated in this study. 2. Workers (Group 1) and employers (Group 2) do not agree in their assessment of the importance or the frequency of use by entry-level workers of the communication skills investigated in this study. 3. Workers (Group 1) and educators K-6 (Group 3) do not agree in their assessment of the importance or the frequency of use by entry-level workers of the communication skills investigated in this study. 4. Workers (Group 1) and educators 7-9 (Group 4) do not agree in their assessment of the importance or the frequency of use by entry-level workers of the communication skills investigated in this study. 5. Workers (Group 1) and educators 10-12 (Group 5) do not agree in their assessment of the importance or the frequency of use by entry-level workers of the communication skills investigated in this study. 6. Workers (Group 1) and educators 13-14 (Group 6) do not agree in their assessment of the importance or the frequency of use by entry-level workers of the communication skills investigated in this study. 7. Workers (Group 1) and educators 14+ (Group 7) do not agree in their assessment of the importance or the frequency of use by entry-level workers of the communication skills investigated in this study. Procedures The instrument used for the study was a survey questionnaire consisting of 38 communication-related tasks. The instrument was sent to a selected sample of respondents representing: workers (industrial mechanics) employers, and educators at various levels. The study employed a one-way analysis of variance design (fixed model). The F-statistic was used in the analysis. For a determination of significant differences, the critical F-ratio was established with six degrees of freedom with alpha = .05. In case of rejection of the original (null) hypothesis, a Least Significant Difference (L.S.D.) test was used to test the six a priori subhypotheses.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6770A in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-11-06T19:59:05Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DilleJeaneL1976.pdf: 839380 bytes, checksum: c84b0688a706f244d9bf726f77c50059 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Madison Medley (mmscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-11-06T19:51:32Z No. of bitstreams: 1 DilleJeaneL1976.pdf: 839380 bytes, checksum: c84b0688a706f244d9bf726f77c50059 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-11-06T23:18:59Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DilleJeaneL1976.pdf: 839380 bytes, checksum: c84b0688a706f244d9bf726f77c50059 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-11-06T23:18:59Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 DilleJeaneL1976.pdf: 839380 bytes, checksum: c84b0688a706f244d9bf726f77c50059 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1976-01-07

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/10/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items