Distribution of Oligonychus (Oligonychus) ununguis (Jacobi) (Acari: Tetranychidae) and predator mite species (Acair: Phytoseiidae) on field-grown Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb] Franco) Christmas trees Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/pk02cd36w

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  • The shake and wash technique (samples placed in a jar with alcohol added and shaken to remove the mites) was effective in removing 100% of the predator mites, and adult spruce spider mites from Douglas-fir foliage and 98% of the spruce spider mite nymphs. Eighty-eight percent of the spruce spider mite eggs was removed. This technique was considered efficient for removal of spruce spider mite and its predators from Douglas-fir foliage. Sodium hypochlorite (0.84%) added to the alcohol did not increase the number of spruce spider mites or phytoseiid mites removed from the foliage. The intracanopy distribution of spruce spider mite and its predator mites was studied on Douglas-fir Christmas trees in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. When overwintering spruce spider mite egg densities populations were low (<5 eggs/19 cm of stem), significantly more eggs were found on the current season's growth. No significant differences were found between top and bottom halves of the tree or between compass directions. Differences between current and previous season's growth were not found when egg densities were high (>40 eggs/19 cm of stem), but significant differences were found between levels for current season's growth with more eggs found in the upper portion of the canopy. Quadri-directional differences did not exist with either low or high mite populations. Sampling tip or basal stem-halves with low overwintering egg populations did not bias population estimates. Heavy spring rainfall appeared to reduce mite populations as has been reported elsewhere by washing them off the tree and causing increased mortality. Spruce spider mite disperse to the current season's growth shortly after budbreak. Population density rapidly increased in late May and then abruptly declined in mid-July.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6770A in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-04-08T19:46:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 CalkinJamesD1991.pdf: 2099634 bytes, checksum: 2405102fba2662f9252c2722724884f2 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1991-02-20
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-08T19:46:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 CalkinJamesD1991.pdf: 2099634 bytes, checksum: 2405102fba2662f9252c2722724884f2 (MD5)

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