Management problems and practices of Asian graduate students at Oregon State University Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/pn89d9239

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  • This study explored the management problems and practices of 41 Asian graduate students at Oregon State University. The students were asked to indicate their management problems and practices of food, clothing, and money, their housing conditions, their problems in finding recreation and transportation, and their problems in their academic work and in practicing their religion. All students were enrolled in the University at the time of the interview. Of the group, 25 were males and 16 were females. Twenty-eight were working for their Master's degrees and 10 were working for a Doctor's degree; three students were taking graduate courses but not working for degrees. When the students were asked about their food managment problems and practices, 35 students indicated that they prepared their own meals, while three students ate with American families, two ate in boarding houses, and one in a cooperative. More than half of the 35 students who cooked their own meals planned them depending on what they had on hand in kitchen cabinets and in the refrigerator. Over one-half of these 35 students shopped for food once a week; however 19 made no shopping list of groceries to buy. Twenty-one of the 41 students had received or were receiving native foods from their own countries . Twenty-two of the 35 students who prepared their own meals shopped in other cities for native foods in addition to shopping regularly in the University community. Lack of time was the management problem most often mentioned by the 35 students who cooked their own food. Of the 41 students, 66 percent had adopted an American type of breakfast and 60 percent had adopted an American type of lunch. The two common food problems indicated by the students were that they wanted more native foods and the cost of food was expensive. More than half of the students wore the same clothes to school in the United States as they wore in their home countries. Twenty students had received clothes from home. Students had purchased clothes in the United States as they needed them or on sale days. Most of the students laundered clothes once a week in their own living quarters where they used the coin-operated washing machines. Ironing was done irregularly by the majority of the student The most common problems the students had with clothing were that clothing in the United States was expensive and that they had difficulty in finding the right size of clothes. Most of the students lived in apartments, either alone or with other students and friends. The most frequently mentioned housing problems were that space was inadequate and the heating system was poor. Twenty-seven of the 41 students made no plans for the use of their money, and only 16 students kept lists of expenditures. Ninety percent of the students had money in the bank, with 46 percent of them having both checking and savings accounts. Problems with academic work centered around understanding lectures. Transportation in the United States did not seem to be a problem to 26 students. Ten students reported owning cars. Almost half of the students felt medical care was expensive. Another problem was the lack of time for recreation which was mentioned by 23 students. In terms of practicing their religion, only five students indicated that they had a problem in practicing their religion in the United States.
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