Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Learning style preference and reading achievement of urban Alaskan native students Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/pr76f6253

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • The American public school system has been delegated the responsibility for providing all children with an equal educational opportunity. For the state of Alaska, this charge is both unique and difficult. The academic performance of Alaskan Native students, the state's largest minority, is a serious concern due to their relatively inferior performance and exceedingly high dropout rate. A literature review revealed few studies dealing with Natives' unique characteristics and none investigating preferred learning style. The purpose of this study was to determine the learning styles of Native students, compare them with their White classmates, determine whether or not sex differences exist and to ascertain the relationship between learning styles and reading achievement. The Learning Style Inventory was administered to 141 Native and 478 White urban Anchorage students, grade 4-6. Data analysis included one- and two-way analysis of variance (ethnic group and sex) and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients (ethnic group and reading achievement). Data analysis led to the rejection of all four null hypotheses (alpha = .05). Significant differences between ethnic groups included: Persistence; Authority Figures Present; Requires Intake; Late Morning; and Consistency. Native students were less persistent, preferred the presence of teachers, desired less intake and preferred working in the late morning, while revealing greater inconsistency of preferences. Native females were significantly better motivated than males on both Self Motivation and Teacher Motivation. Two low, but significant, correlations were found between Native preferences (Noise Level and Responsibility) and reading achievement, while eleven were significant for White students. It was concluded that significant differences do exist between Alaskan Native and White students' learning styles which may have educational implications. The data also suggest that acculturation may modify Natives' preferred learning styles and that the unique northern environment shared by both groups may cause unique physiological responses which make Natives and Whites more common on selected characteristics than either are to the normative group. Recommendations included replication of the present study with both rural and urban Natives, exploring the impact of acculturation upon learning styles, determining whether or not life in the far North causes physiological responses which result in unique commonalities for its inhabitants and exploration of the construct of sequential-simultaneous information processing ability with Natives.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • Master files scanned at 600 ppi (256 Grayscale) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9080C in TIF format. PDF derivative scanned at 300 ppi (256 B&W), using Capture Perfect 3.0, on a Canon DR-9080C. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-03-30T17:16:23Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Clyne_Roger D._1984.pdf: 1050175 bytes, checksum: 45acb415001c4516d8752dcb02e026fb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-03-30T17:15:31Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Clyne_Roger D._1984.pdf: 1050175 bytes, checksum: 45acb415001c4516d8752dcb02e026fb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-03-30T17:16:22Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Clyne_Roger D._1984.pdf: 1050175 bytes, checksum: 45acb415001c4516d8752dcb02e026fb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-03-30T17:16:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Clyne_Roger D._1984.pdf: 1050175 bytes, checksum: 45acb415001c4516d8752dcb02e026fb (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items