Value differences in university living groups Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/pv63g272h

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  • The purpose of this study was to explore possible differences in value patterns of students residing in four types of university living environments--residence halls, Greek houses, cooperatives, and off campus dwellings. The Rokeach Value Survey was utilized as the major measurement tool for identification of the value patterns of students. Within each living group type, 125 males and 125 females were asked to respond to the questionnaire, creating a total random sample of 1, 000. The data were collected during Fall Term 1976, on the Oregon State University campus. The hypotheses considered seven major factors: immediate versus delayed gratification, competence versus religious morality, self-constriction versus self-expansion, social versus personal orientation, societal versus family security, respect versus love, and inner- versus other-directed. The analysis of variance technique with the F-ratio was used to identify significant differences between the value rankings of students in the four living groups. The level of significance was set at . 01 for all of the tests. Additional analyses of data included comparisons of value rankings of students grouped according to sex, academic major, level of participation in campus activities, political philosophy, hometown size, and geographic region. The major findings were as follows: 1) As a whole, students rated delayed gratification, self-expansion, personal orientation, family security, love, and inner-directed values higher than the opposite factor poles, respectively. 2) Students from Greek houses tended to place significantly less importance on the delayed gratification values when compared to the other groups. 3) Students who reside in off-campus environments tended to give higher priority to competence values, while members of the university sponsored living groups considered religious morality values more important. 4) When comparisons were made on self-expansion and self-constriction values, it was found that students from cooperatives, ranked expansion values significantly lower than did students from the other three living groups. 5) Students residing in Greek houses ranked family security values significantly higher than did students in the other groups when compared with societal values. 6) Students residing in cooperative and off-campus units tended to rate love values significantly higher than did Greek or residence hall students, when compared with respect values. 7) Students in residence halls tended to rate inner-directed values significantly lower than did members of the other groups, when compared with other-directed values, while off-campus residents ranked the inner-directed values significantly higher. 8) Comparisons between factors when students were grouped according to sex revealed that females tended to rate delayed gratification, religious morality, societal, and inner-directed values significantly higher than did males. 9) Students who classify themselves as liberals tended to rate societal, competence, and self-expansion values higher than did "middle-of-the-road" or conservative students when contrasted with family security, religious morality, or selfconstriction values, respectively. 10) Immediate gratification values were rated higher by students who identified themselves as active in campus events when compared with students who were classified as non-participants. The results of this study offer a basis for further research on student values, as well as providing those associated with institutions of higher learning information on the value patterns of students who reside in different types of environments.
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