The theory, design, and construction of a 5 k.w., 125 volt, compounded, direct current generator Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/pz50h010z

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • It has been a standing problem among the scientists of the past and will perhaps be puzzled-over for many centuries to come; namely the most efficient method of transmitting power from one point to another. The nearest solution at present, and a very satisfactory one, is electricity. By means of generators, transformers, transmission lines, and motors, power can be transmitted for a considerable distance with quite high efficiency. There are many possibilities in the field of electrical transmission of power, for electricity is comparatively in its infancy, and new features are being developed along this line almost daily. Think of the startling discoveries and wonderful inventions by such men as Lord Kelvin, Steinmetz, Edison, and Marconi; the three latter are still living with power to add to their wonderful achievements. Few are the towns that do not boast of electric lights, and thousands are the factories that use electric power. Countless miles of street car systems are operated by electricity, and quite recently the railroads are adopting electric traction thus opening another very extensive filed for this ideal form of power. The fuel supply of this country, though of enormous quantities, will not last forever. Ultimately we will be forced to use water power for the greater portion of our industries; which can only be satisfactorily accomplished by the means of electricity. The dynamo is a mysterious piece of mechanism to the people who know nothing of the theory upon which it is constructed. They view it with awe, for they see no visible means by which that curious machine can transmit so much energy, nor how it can cause such woeful disturbance to the nervous system of the human body. They believe a man is a wizard possessed with worldwide knowledge who can operate with this silent medium of power. They do not realize that thousands of incandescents and numberless horse power for factories are supplied through two or three metallic wires. Yet to one who has investigated the theory of this wonderful invention, there is nothing complicated about it. The public at large does not get enough information about the construction of electrical machinery. A dynamo is not as complex as an ordinary steam engine, and almost any American boy, with any mechanical intuition whatsoever, can easily explain the operation of the ordinary steam engine. The large companies seem to have secured the manufacturing of all kinds of electrical apparatus; and everything pertaining to the various steps of their manufacture is kept secret in order to keep their rivals from gaining any detrimental information; thus the public does not obtain any of the details of the construction of these worldwide utilities. Electrical energy is produced by the cutting of lines of force by inductors, these inductors are tapped by a collecting device which is connected to the mains. The lines of force are produced by magnets diametrically opposite each other and of opposite polarity. These may be either permanent or solenoid magnets; the latter being almost exclusively used in the manufacture of electrical generators. Either the magnetic field or the inductors may be rotated so as to allow the latter to cut lines of force. In direct current machines the inductors are rotated in the magnetic field while in some alternators the field is revolved. Exitation may be had from an external source or by current taken from the armature. The inductors are generally wound on a drum shaped core of laminated wrought iron called the armature. This is fastened to a shaft which is rotated by a prime mover. The commutator is the part which facilitates the collection of the energy. It consists of a number of copper bars of equal size, each insulated from the remainder and fastened together in the shape of a cylinder. Copper or carbon strips are used to collect the current from the rotating commutator; these are called brushes and are placed in the neutral plane.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-03-03T18:02:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1WiggenEugeneCyrus1908.pdf: 9631446 bytes, checksum: b78ccbb6c9dc09fd08d6538eef6917af (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Sergio Trujillo (jstscanner@gmail.com) on 2014-02-28T21:18:10ZNo. of bitstreams: 1WiggenEugeneCyrus1908.pdf: 9631446 bytes, checksum: b78ccbb6c9dc09fd08d6538eef6917af (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-03-03T16:47:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1WiggenEugeneCyrus1908.pdf: 9631446 bytes, checksum: b78ccbb6c9dc09fd08d6538eef6917af (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-03-03T18:02:21Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1WiggenEugeneCyrus1908.pdf: 9631446 bytes, checksum: b78ccbb6c9dc09fd08d6538eef6917af (MD5) Previous issue date: 1908

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items