Design analysis using function-based failure propagation in failed system states Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/q524jq84z

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  • For safety critical complex systems, reliability and risk analysis are important design steps. Implementing these analyzes early in the design stage can reduce costs associated with redesign and provide important information on design viability. In the past several years, various research methods have been presented in the design community to move reliability analysis into the early conceptual design stages. Concept stage reliability analysis faces several challenges. First, in complex systems, the integration of software and hardware into a single reliability framework is hampered by the different risk factors and behaviors of these two types of subsystems. Secondly, quantifying risk in order to make design decision is challenging when minimal technical information of the system and components is known. Finally, the current methods of conceptual design reliability analysis use a functional representation as the basis for reliability analysis. However, in non-nominal system states, the functional representation can have serious limitations. This limitation is evident when failures are modeled to propagate along energy, material, and signal (EMS) flows. A function-based reliability method must consider all potential flows, and not be limited to the function structure of the nominal state. This work introduces the Flow State Logic (FSL) method as a means for reasoning on the state of EMS flows. This method provides a means to assess failure propagation over potential flows that were not considered in a functional representation of a “nominally functioning” design. The impact with respect to the operating state of functional elements can be calculated for these possible flow failures as well as other failure events. The results from this type of analysis can then be used to make design decisions for integrated software-hardware, complex systems.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by David Jensen (jensend@onid.orst.edu) on 2009-06-16T19:51:26Z No. of bitstreams: 1 2009 Jensen Thesis Final.pdf: 5289769 bytes, checksum: 62f36def7a74c33ee7337698c43634f5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by David Jensen (jensend@onid.orst.edu) on 2009-06-10T01:05:01Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Jensen Thesis 2009.pdf: 5686783 bytes, checksum: ca8560c7e6c578fd4fa463f7f1f39f2b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-06-18T14:10:07Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 2009 Jensen Thesis Final.pdf: 5289769 bytes, checksum: 62f36def7a74c33ee7337698c43634f5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Rejected by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu), reason: Rejecting to change commencement date to June 2009. Once revised, open the item that was rejected. Replace the attached file with the revised file, and resubmit. Thanks, Julie on 2009-06-16T19:42:31Z (GMT)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-06-18T14:10:07Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 2009 Jensen Thesis Final.pdf: 5289769 bytes, checksum: 62f36def7a74c33ee7337698c43634f5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-06-17T18:55:28Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 2009 Jensen Thesis Final.pdf: 5289769 bytes, checksum: 62f36def7a74c33ee7337698c43634f5 (MD5)

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