Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Is family beyond justice? : exploring determinants of wives' perceived fairness about the division of household labor and child care in Thailand Public Deposited

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  • The researcher 1) explored Thai employed wives' perceived fairness in the division of household labor and child care, 2) investigated factors determining Thai's working wives' perception of fairness in the division of household labor and child care, and 3) developed a model of the determinants of wives' perceived fairness in the division of household labor and child care. In the model above, relationships were explored between perceived fairness and twenty independent variables. The data are based on a survey administered to 600 employed wives from three different kinds of workplaces in Bangkok, Thailand: Government sector (n=214), quasi-government sector (n=191) and private sector (n=195). Employed wives were recruited by purposive sampling from each workplace. In addition qualitative interviews were used with a convenience sample of 30 employed wives selected by purposive sampling from the large sample of 600. The interview data suggest explanations for wives' perceived fairness in the division of household labor and child care. Stepwise multiple regression was used to develop a model of the determinants predicting wives' perceived fairness in the division of household labor and child care. Findings are that perceived fairness was positively correlated with feeling appreciated, marital happiness, within-gender comparisons, spending time together, work hours/day, family harmony, and wife's ascription to traditional women's roles; but was negatively correlated with wife's value of housework and men's incompetence at housework. The results of the stepwise multiple regression on perceived fairness of the division of household labor indicated that only 9 of 20 independent variables (predictors) enter the regression model at the .05 level of significance or above, accounting for 32% of the variability. The overall relationship of all predictors to perceived fairness was fairly high. Feeling appreciated is the best predictor, followed by marital happiness, within-gender comparison, wife's value of housework, spending time together, work hours/day of wife, family harmony, wife's ascription of women's roles, and men incompetence at housework. The interview data also support the survey data in that outcome value influence wives' perceived fairness. Wives value several outcomes in doing household work and child care. Comparison referents and justifications are another mechanisms that influence wives' perceived fairness. Most wives use several standards when they evaluate fairness, and also use many reasons to justify lower participation of their husbands. Even though gender ideology as measured, in the survey data, does not contribute much to wives' perceived fairness, the interview data strongly suggest that traditional values and culture in Thai society influence and guide wives' choices of comparison referents and justifications to accept the unbalanced of division of labor as fair for them. Both data sets reinforce that wives' perceived fairness is a result of subjective perception, influenced by emotional needs of wives. The study confirms that outcome values, comparison referents and justifications, along with marital happiness and spending time together with husbands all play important roles in explaining wives' perceived fairness. Results are discussed in terms of the relationship between possible determinants and wives' perceived fairness in the division of household labor and child care. In additions, implications for future research, policy, and education/training are discussed.
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