Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Evaluation and optimization of large-scale engineering system modularity using an axiomatic design approach Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/q811km978

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Large-scale engineering systems provide important functions and at the same time address serious concerns to human society. Because of the complexity and resources involved, the development of these systems is currently a challenging undertaking. In this work, an axiomatic design approach, based on Suhs axiomatic design theory, and combined with aspects of design of experiments, response surface modeling, and optimization techniques, is developed for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale engineering systems. Modularity is a key factor in producing simpler structures, more robust performance, and consuming fewer resources, and therefore, used as a consistent criteria to evaluate and improve an existing design. The mathematical representation of functional independence in Suh's axiomatic design theory is adopted to measure modularity at both conceptual and parametric levels. At a conceptual level, the approach organizes and decomposes multiple, competing functional requirements of a large-scale engineering system, and relates them to their associated physical embodiments based on axiom 1. The design matrix, Reangularity, and Semiangularity, are used at a parametric level to evaluate the modularity of the system design. If the evaluation shows any areas for improvement, an optimization procedure is adopted to achieve a safer and more robust design by increasing the modularity. The Reactor Cavity Cooling System in General Atomics' Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor is used to demonstrate the use of the axiomatic design approach in an industrial application. The results show that the axiomatic design approach provides a viable approach to systematically evaluate a large-scale engineering system against multiple, competing design objectives and help improve the quality of the current design.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Conference Name
Conference Section/Track
Conference Location
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 256 Grayscale) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Eric Vanderwall (ewscanner@gmail.com) on 2011-08-04T18:30:28ZNo. of bitstreams: 1ThielmanJeffreyL2004.pdf: 5686527 bytes, checksum: e098a2f662261456487874b45935e5b3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-08-08T19:27:21Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1ThielmanJeffreyL2004.pdf: 5686527 bytes, checksum: e098a2f662261456487874b45935e5b3 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2003-12-10
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-08-08T19:27:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1ThielmanJeffreyL2004.pdf: 5686527 bytes, checksum: e098a2f662261456487874b45935e5b3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-08-08T18:03:15Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1ThielmanJeffreyL2004.pdf: 5686527 bytes, checksum: e098a2f662261456487874b45935e5b3 (MD5)
Embargo reason

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items