Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Toward An Academic Theory of Social Justice Judgment and Decision-Making : Rights, Justice, and Legal Ideology Public Deposited

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  • This dissertation serves a threefold purpose: 1. identify the principles, practices and assumptions implicated in an academic theory of social justice; 2. continue moving towards articulating a theory of social justice judgment and decision making; and 3. develop a model of social justice judgment and decision making that will assist interested populations engaged in social policies and issues. Historically and culturally, social justice judgments and decisions are more commonly generated by, framed within, and dependent upon satisfying [pre]dispositions (cf., generative processes) associated with enforcing and normalizing rights and rules through a tumultuous history of morality and ethicality (Lassman, 2000; Nash, 2003; Rydgren, 1949), predicated in part on rights, justice and legal ideology. As it stands, it can be stated that within academia social justice is accountability, handed down from politics and economics; albeit, in academic terms, “accountability as moral accountability is a primary requirement of interpretation, formulated upon coherence theory” (Skrla et al., 2004, p. 10). Theoretically, proposing that within the scope of justice, academic social justice judgments and decisions reflect structure, domain specific functions, and frames of reference (cf., ontological thought). To these ends, rights, justice, and legal ideology are theorized as necessary for the explication, formulation and application of an academic theory of social justice judgment and decision-making.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-09-23T15:02:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1DissertationWernerM.pdf: 589841 bytes, checksum: 9934462932656892050367590575381b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-09-26T20:02:18Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1DissertationWernerM.pdf: 589841 bytes, checksum: 9934462932656892050367590575381b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2016-09-26T20:02:19Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1DissertationWernerM.pdf: 589841 bytes, checksum: 9934462932656892050367590575381b (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-08-01
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Michael Werner (wernerm) on 2016-09-22T23:54:18ZNo. of bitstreams: 1DissertationWernerM.pdf: 589841 bytes, checksum: 9934462932656892050367590575381b (MD5)
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  • 2017-08-09 to 2018-09-26

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