Factors influencing fruit bud formation and yield of the Marion blackberry Public Deposited

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  • In 1960 tests were initiated on the Marion blackberry (Rubus hybrid) to study the effect of (1) plant spacing, (2) time of training canes to the trellis and (3) amount of cane to train to the trellis with regard to fruit bud formation and total yield. Plant spacing varied with 2.5, 5 and 10 feet between plants in the row. Time of training the canes to the trellis was approximately the middle of the months of August, September, October and February. The amount of cane trained on the trellis was either the entire length of all sound canes or only enough of each cane to reach the adjacent plant. Total yield of fruit, fruit spur determinations, time of fruit bud formation, leaf size and number and carbohydrate:nitrogen ratio of leaves were studied and/or measured. Although yield differences were greatest in the early years of the planting, 4-year averages indicate that closer spacing of plants resulted in highly significant increases. August-trained canes produced the highest yields, followed in order by February, September and October. Differences in yield between the length of canes trained were very small and generally non-significant. When more cane grox<rth was trained, a corresponding increase in training time was required, particularly at the closer plant spacings. August and September training of canes stimulated the axillary buds to elongate and produce lateral growth. These laterals on August-trained canes matured enough to allow the formation of fruit buds, while laterals on September-trained canes were generally too succulent to form fruit buds. August-trained canes produced more fruit spurs per foot of row than February-trained canes. No difference in number of flower buds per fruit spur occurred between August and February training. Leaf counts on November 1 indicated that trellis training done in August produced more trifoliate leaves per foot of row than when the canes remained on the ground. Trifoliate leaves from ground-level training were larger. Axillary buds were collected at 2-week intervals starting on August 1 and continuing until November 15 for the purpose of determining the time of fruit bud formation. The canes were divided into three sections, (1) basal, (2) mid-and (3) terminal, and each sampled separately. Buds from trellis-level training changed little during August and September; however, on October 2, buds from the terminal area only of canes and laterals were showing elongation. By mid-October, buds from all areas of the cane were showing an elongation of the apex. The first and only floral structure, expressed as a broadening and flattening of the apex, was observed in terminal section buds sampled on November 15. In contrast, basal and mid-section buds from canes trained along the ground during the summer showed an elongation of the apex by October 2, and by November 15 well defined floral structures were observed. Buds from the terminal section of cane were beginning to show some elongation by mid-November. Carbohydrate and nitrogen determinations were made on trifoliate leaves sampled from various loci on the canes on November 1. Older leaves, regardless of plant spacing or time of training, had the lowest nitrogen content. Carbohydrate content of leaves was quite variable. The C:N ratio was lowest for the 5-foot spacing in both trellis-level and ground-level training. Leaves from the terminal area of the.canes had the lowest C:N ratio.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Tamera Ontko (toscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2011-09-01T19:31:29Z No. of bitstreams: 1 LD4330 1967 165.pdf: 1038457 bytes, checksum: 0686f7cf98f524a939bd7e9849702de1 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-09-19T19:28:55Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LD4330 1967 165.pdf: 1038457 bytes, checksum: 0686f7cf98f524a939bd7e9849702de1 (MD5)
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