Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Identification of opinions that university bicyclists and pedestrians possess regarding their safety from a bicycle traffic-related injury on campus Public Deposited

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  • This study investigated the opinions of bicyclists/pedestrians regarding how safe from a bicycle traffic injury they felt while on campus. Most earlier studies had been concerned with the taxonomy of bicycle/pedestrian accidents. Because of the paucity of research on attitudes of bicyclists and pedestrians, this research was undertaken. The survey instrument was developed in accordance with recommendations from the Oregon State University Survey & Research Center. It consisted of 19 Likert type, degree of variation statements, and ten biographical questions. The sample consisted of 214 students registered for the winter term of 1986 at Oregon State University. Participants completed the Traffic Safety Attitude Survey and then were placed in the following categories: male, female, bicyclists, and pedestrians. The Survey instrument was designed to test four null hypotheses and to define other broadly held opinions regarding traffic safety on campus. Hypotheses One through Three tested interaction between bicyclists/pedestrians. The fourth hypothesis tested the difference between male bicyclists and male pedestrians and female bicyclists and female pedestrians. The Chi Square Test and a two-way analysis of variance were employed to test the hypotheses. Two significant findings emerged from hypothesis testing: 1) bicyclists and pedestrians differed on the opinion that as much as possible is being done to provide campus bicycle traffic safety, and 2) pedestrians endorsed stricter adherence to bicycle traffic regulations than bicyclists. There was no difference between bicyclists and pedestrians regarding feelings of safety from a bicycle traffic-related injury. Finally, gender had no effect on perceptions of campus bicycle traffic safety. Analysis of the results of this research provided the following conclusions: 1. Male bicyclists felt the least at risk of injury from a bicycle traffic-related injury on campus. 2. Female pedestrians felt the most risk of injury from a bicycle traffic accident on campus. 3. Female bicyclists, female pedestrians, and male pedestrians shared similar opinions regarding risk of exposure to a bicycle traffic accident on campus. 4. Approximately 30% of all subjects felt there is a problem with interaction between bicyclists and pedestrians on the OSU campus. 5. Approximately 46% of the pedestrians and 25% of the bicyclists felt risk of sustaining a bicycle traffic-related injury on campus. 6. Approximately 38% of the pedestrians and 25% of the bicyclists support some form of bicycle traffic restriction. 7. Pedestrians endorse stricter adherance to bicycle traffic regulations that bicyclists do. 8: Pedestrians felt less is being done to ensure bicycle traffic safety on campus than bicyclists did.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-01-31T20:46:22Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TuylsGaryWilliam1986.pdf: 2567730 bytes, checksum: fe998fc6503cbeacced9125928327b48 (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-01-31T20:45:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TuylsGaryWilliam1986.pdf: 2567730 bytes, checksum: fe998fc6503cbeacced9125928327b48 (MD5)
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