Acute and delayed effects of an exhaustive bout of exercise on landing biomechanics in women and men Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/qf85nd69t

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  • Although female athletes are at greater risk of non-contact knee injuries than men, the factors that contribute to these injuries are not well understood. One important question is whether intense exercise influences the risk of knee injury, both acutely and over the following days. The purpose of this study was thus to evaluate the acute and delayed effects of an intense bout of exercise on risk factors associated with knee injury in women and men. Fifteen each of healthy young women and men performed two testing sessions, 44-52 hours apart. In each session, biomechanical data were collected during execution of sets of 10 drop vertical jumps. An initial set of drop vertical jumps was compared to a set performed immediately after an intense exercise bout on the first day and to a set performed on the second day to determine the acute and delayed effects of fatigue, respectively. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine the effect of the exercise bout on risk factors associated with knee injury during the jump task in women and men. Intense exercise had immediate effects on joint kinematics and kinetics, patterns of joint motion and moments, and the variability of joint couplings. The acute kinematic and kinetic changes at the hip and ankle were consistent with compensatory strategies, whereas changes at the knee were consistent with an increased risk of injury. The same appeared to be true for the patterns of joint motions and moments. Acute changes in the variability of inter- and intra-limb joint couplings were also consistent with compensatory modifications of lower limb biomechanics. Delayed effects were limited to patterns of joint motion and moments, and reflected jointdependent combinations of compensatory strategies or mechanical changes that could increase knee injury risk. Although intense exercise had acute and prolonged effects on several biomechanical variables, none of the effects depended on the sex of participants. These results indicate that intense exercise has immediate and prolonged effects on landing biomechanics, independent of sex. While the majority of changes point to a compensatory strategy, a few were consistent with increased risk of knee injury.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-08-25T18:05:50Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Kipp_Dissertation.pdf: 319613 bytes, checksum: 824819bbdcf6e3f411106eb41632c0e0 (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-08-19T17:17:20Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Kipp_Dissertation.pdf: 319613 bytes, checksum: 824819bbdcf6e3f411106eb41632c0e0 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kristof Kipp (kippkr@onid.orst.edu) on 2009-08-19T17:09:11Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Kipp_Dissertation.pdf: 319613 bytes, checksum: 824819bbdcf6e3f411106eb41632c0e0 (MD5)

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