Livestock utilization of a clear-cut burn in northeastern Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/qf85nd70k

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Three five acre exclosures were established in 1964 to monitor vegetational regeneration and forage productivity on a coniferous forest site in northeastern Oregon which was clear-cut in 1963, broadcast burned and seeded in 1964. Fence design and construction to facilitate controlled early summer cattle grazing trials was completed by 1965. One exclosure, I, excluded indigenous big game species, mule deer (Odocoileus heinionus) and elk (Cervus canadensis) as well as cattle (Bos tarus); the remaining two, II and III, excluded cattle only. It had become evident by 1969 that the amount of available herbaceous forage in the game exclosure was decreasing as the amount of browse production increased. This study was set up during the summer of 1970 to quantitatively evaluate the amount, preference and nutritive value of browse utilized by cattle. Following an early summer grazing trial, five mature cows were placed in I from 19 August to 2 September, 1970. These animals lost an average of 6.7 pounds/day. The control group on meadow pasture lost an average of 2.3 pounds/day. The cows in I preferred herbaceous species, but as these were utilized, they grazed elderberry (Sambucus cerulea ), willow (Salix ssp. ), ninebark (Physocarpus malvaceus), redstem ceanothus (Ceanothu.s sanguineus ), and snowbrush (C. velutinus) in descending order of preference. Browsing on conifers was negligible, and only 2% of the trees were injured by trampling. Frequency and density of all plant species and cover of the shrub species were taken (in exclosures I and II) in June of 1971. Frequency data, incorporated into an association table, confirmed the presence of two plant communities, each displaying different floral composition. Shrub density on the ridge type, designated a Ponderosa pine community, was almost identical between I and U. Exclosure II, however, contained only two-thirds the cover of I. Shrub density in I of the slope type, a mixed coniferous forest community, was almost twice that of II; cover in I was four times that of II. These differences between exclosures were attributed to big game use. Mature cows, pre-conditioned to a browse diet, were placed in I from 13 August to 27 August 1971. They gained .81 pounds/day, while the control group on an adjacent forested area lost .64 pounds/day. Elderberry, willow, redstem ceanothus, snowbrush, and ninebark was the descending order of browse preference that year. Conifer loss was restricted to only negligible trampling damage. To date, it appears that the number of conifer trees and the average tree height between I and II have not been influenced by the grazing treatments. An indirect competition factor (similar plant species preference but at different seasons) was found to exist between the big game animals and the domestic livestock. Previous research indicates that mule deer prefer such species as ninebark, snowbrush, redstem ceanothus, oceanspray (Holodiscus discolor), and willow during the spring and early summer. The late summer grazing cows indicated a similar preference. The only direct competition (similar plant species preference during the same season) observed was in 19 71 when the early summer grazing heifers made heavy utilization of ninebark.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • Pages 8, 26, 36 and 38: File scanned at 300 ppi (24-bit Color) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 3.1 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR. All other pages: File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-09-01T15:58:35Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RedactedEricksonLloydRonald1974.pdf: 3366818 bytes, checksum: 086f469866fa8ad938ead961fab7d3e3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Eric Vanderwall (ewscanner@gmail.com) on 2010-08-31T18:03:47Z No. of bitstreams: 1 RedactedEricksonLloydRonald1974.pdf: 3366818 bytes, checksum: 086f469866fa8ad938ead961fab7d3e3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2010-09-01T15:58:35Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 RedactedEricksonLloydRonald1974.pdf: 3366818 bytes, checksum: 086f469866fa8ad938ead961fab7d3e3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Digital Production(digitalproduc@gmail.com) on 2010-08-31T19:52:27Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RedactedEricksonLloydRonald1974.pdf: 3366818 bytes, checksum: 086f469866fa8ad938ead961fab7d3e3 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/07/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items